Texfire

To paint and how to paint, that is the question.

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I just insulated and sheetrocked the shop to prep for installing air conditioning. It's taped and floated and I wasn't intially planning on painting it, but I'm changing my mind. I find the patchy look a little distracting, and the overall color grayer than I expected. If I'm going to do it, while all the equipment is out of the shop and before I put up the french cleats is the right time. Another potential bonus to painting it is sealing the sheetrock against contaminants. Plus, if I paint it white I'll maximize my lighting.

Any feedback? Any suggestions on paint type(interior, exterior, kilz, sealer, ect,) would be appreciated, I'm not a painter. Also, if there's any reason to go with something other than white I'm all ears, though I'm thinking that another color could add a cast to the reflected light when staining furniture?

Planning on getting my ducks in a row tomorrow and painting it this weekend.

Tex

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You're lucky and real smart to paint while the place is still empty.

When I painted my shop, I went with the brightest, glossiest white paint I could find. Bright white for the reasons you mention, and glossy so it cleans up easy. I've been more than happy with the result.

Regarding paint types, the need for a separate primer, etc., I'm as clue-free as you.

-- Russ

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Just an idea. They have paint that will actually make your wall a dry erase board. You could paint with that and then use the walls to do sketches or write down dimensions, whatever you need.

X2

This sounds useful, they also make chalk board paint. Might be a good idea to reserve a spot about 4'x5' or so. It'd be nice to jot down ideas on the fly.

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If you can, mark the studs where you wish to hang stuff before painting the walls. Or, even get the French cleats attached now and either remove them for paint (leaving convenient holes to remind yourself later) or paint over them.

As for color casts, fluorescent tubes will shift things greenish, but unpredictably so. Theoretically, you'd want to paint the walls a slight purple to counteract this, but that sounds weird. I'd just go with a plain white and be prepared to bring in a few tungsten work lamps that you can position where needed.

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The white gloss is a great idea. I would suggest doing one coat of primer first, then the glossy white. It doesn't have to be expensive primer, just something to keep the drywall and plaster from soaking in too much of your top coat.

One way to mark your studs is to make a mark on the floor. When you have the wall painted, you can then move your mark back to the wall to keep track of your studs.

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For the shop just go to a big box store and buy the inexpensive primer (I use kilz but not for any good reason other than it is on the shelf and says, 'primer') and maybe white paint - semi gloss if you do. I've got a number of sheetrocked walls in the 'utility' areas of my house - landary room, shop, storage - with nothing but white primer on them. Only you, me and my wife know that.

Don't put too much effort into the paint job - just get it covered. It's a shop, it will get dirty, banged up and generally abused.

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I just got done drywalling and painting my shop. I used the paint/primer in one stuff...Behr, I think, from HD. Two coats was "good enough," probably could have used a third, but I hate painting so I stopped there. Like Russ, I used bright white, but I was a little afraid gloss would reflect so much light it would make my shop like Kramer's apartment in the Kenny Roger's Roasters episode. Maybe that fear was unfounded, but I went with flat anyway. It still brightened the shop remarkably.

Definitely paint now while you have an empty space...you'll regret it later if you don't. It transforms the shop for the better in a major way.

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Definitely paint it. It will not only look a lot nicer but it will seal and protect the walls. I personally would not use glossy bright white paint on the walls. Both are hard on the eyes, at least my eyes, in such a large space. That type of paint is most suitable to doors and trim. I would go with a semi-gloss in an offwhite color. It will still be easy to clean and will still be bright but will be more livable. Or paint it any light color you like as you will be spending a lot of time in this room and it should be a pleasant place to be.

I would prime it. Kilz as someone suggested is a good one, it has a mildewicide so is great for bathrooms and damp spaces to keep mildew and mold at bay. Plus it is a generally good primer to use anywhere. As far as why prime and then paint? Paint is $$$ and fresh drywall will soak up bunches of it. The hardest part about painting is getting started, looking at a big room like that is daunting. But, once you get started it goes a lot quicker than you would think, especially now when the room is empty and you don't have to move things around.

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It's a shop, it will get dirty, banged up and generally abused.

Only if you let it.

-- Russ

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Thanks for the feedback. I'm going to check out prices and see if a primer/paint or primer then paint is the best way to go. I was planning on marking the studs before painting, but an excellent reminder. Had to go to the store anyway, my mower died this morning... <_<

Update, got 5 gallons of PVA primer at Big Orange this morning. I'm hoping that I'll get two coats out of it, at that point I'll be able to see if the primer is good enough, or if I need a final coat of paint.

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To throw 2 more cents in the pot, I had white walls for a number of years. I ended up with new lighting (T8? Thin tubes...) and painted 1/2 of my shop a very warm and considerably dark color. The new lights are so bright, the walls don't seem dark at all, and I like it 10 times better than the white. Now to move all my stuff out of the way to paint the floor.....

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That's what I've got, seven two-bulb T8 fixtures. I wonder if I shouldn't have gotten 4-bulb fixtures instead, but that's a possibility down the line if I need more light. I think going with the white is going to maximize my available light, I'll lose some of it as I cover the walls with cabinets, tool boards, ect.

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Okay, I've got half of the garage painted, with one coat... :unsure: Anyone used a HVLP to spray paint? I've been thinking of getting one for staining and this roller stuff is for the birds... Definitely going to take at least two coats to get good coverage.

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Never painted sheet rock... deliberately, anyway.

Have painted basement with "touch up coat." (previous coat was 30 years old...) White gets dirt stuck to it fast. You don't realize how fast. If you don't intend to really clean it periodically (many different factors, including smoking, finishing fumes, dust, traffic, etc), I'd go for an off white in the brighter shade, or something in the light / faint beige category. Of course, I used a brush and a roller.... Didn't actually take all that long.

I seem to recall the Big Trio (Marc, Shannon, and Matt) commenting on non-white walls for photography and video... just another stick in the pond...

(Really liking that whiteboard and chalkboard idea... also liking the idea of a "magnetic" area... so you can leave magnetic posts around... like the safety key conveniently out of reach for some independent minded toddler type... or a reminder to get more finish, etc)

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Thanks for the feedback, but it's flat white over the primer coats. I decided that I didn't know enough about how well the PVA primer would wear on it's own, so I'm playing it safe and adding a flat white latex over the primer. Also added is I never want to have to go through this again so it's getting all the paint it'll ever get. Looks like one coat will be plenty, it actually turned out very nicely. The sheetrock was brighter already, but the white latex really added to the reflected lighting.

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