One car garage shop


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Folks,

I have finally started on a dedicated wood shop. It is going to be built in one bay of a three car garage. The back half of the center bay is a finish room. The shop bay is 25' by 11' 6". The finish room is 12' x 10'.

I was fortunate to purchase a rather complete wood shop from a woman. Most of the equipment is new. I have looked for a book or some web site that will help me layout the equipment initially. I understand that everything is subject to rearranging but I am planning on a professional dust collection system so it would be helpful to get things close the first time.

Major power tools:

Delta 10" table saw with infeed and outfeed tables

Delta planer

Delta 20" band saw

Delta 6" belt sander

Delta floor mount drill press

Delta router table

Hitachi compound miter saw

Jet sander

Jet shaper

6' lathe

Tormic sharpener (??)

There are a pile of hand tools and two work benches with end and leg vises. Most of the power tools have some kind of formica table associated with them with aluminum T slots.

Any thoughts on work flow and layour would be appreciated.

I also have my dad's original (from the 50s) Craftsmen table saw and radical arm saw. The table saw is cast iron and must weigh 600 pounds. The radial arm saw is atleast on wheels.

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Past issues of Wood magazine( not sure which ones but you may be able to find them searching their online article index) have had several good articles on setting up an efficient small shop space. For the most part lumber storage and tools used to break down and mill rough lumber(compound miter saw, jointer, planer) should be close to the main entrance. Most of the time the table saw resides somewhere near the center of the shop. I use my workbench as an outfeed table so that (in my shop) butts right up behind the table saw. A good source for virtually setting up any shop space is the tool on Grizzly's home page www.grizzly.com They have scale models of their tools and a sheet of "graph paper" along with models of common structural components. You can play around with it until you find a layout that works best for you. (a lot easier than moving large, heavy equipment) I believe you can even save and print the plan. Hope this helps you get started. Congratulations on your new toys.

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A good source for virtually setting up any shop space is the tool on Grizzly's home page www.grizzly.com They have scale models of their tools and a sheet of "graph paper" along with models of common structural components.

+1 on the Grizzly layout tool

(Can I give it more than +1? Like, plus seventy or so?)

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Rick,

Thanks for the pictures! It is more crowded in there then I had hoped. I have listed only the large power tools. I purchased an entire shop which now inhabits and literally fills from top to bottom, a 7 x 15 storage room. Many of the power tools have mobile bases. I can see that everything except for the table saw will need one. I am constructing a 10' x 12' finishing room in the adjoining bay of the garage (which leaves enough room for the snowmobile trailer in front of the room). I planned to basically seal the room to keep it dust free but now I am thinking that I will need to store power tools on mobile bases in it. Overabundance. In addition to the listed tools there are two 60" x 30" maple workbenches, a rolling Craftman tool chest 48" wide, and the list goes on. The dust collection system won't be in the shop. It is outside and feeds through the wall. It is a 5hp with 11" head and 3200 CFM.

Could you tell me a bit more about how the workflow is set up in your shop? Maybe a few more pics?

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One thing you could consider is building shop bench/storage along the wall, where the tools will "temporarily reside" when not in use. I'd set the bench / shelf height as just above the height of the tool. (For example, the jointer: put that portion of a cabinet as just higher than the upper edge of the fence / tallest portion. That way, you can roll the tool into it's spot after use, and still use the wall / cabinet above. lumber storage, planes - for irony's sake - or sand paper, whatever.)

I know that there's an example shop layout out there for a small footprint, but I don't happen to have the link available at the moment. (The book happens to be on loan, so I can't scan the page in, either...) Let me see what I can find...

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I know that there's an example shop layout out there for a small footprint, but I don't happen to have the link available at the moment. (The book happens to be on loan, so I can't scan the page in, either...) Let me see what I can find...

Name of the book, by the way, is _Small Woodworking Shops_

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That's no longer my shop. We moved and I went from that 300 SqFt shop to my current 1200 SqFt shop. I only needed to add two more machines so there's lots of space now. In the other shop, I was constantly rearranging until everything seemed to flow right. I imagine you'll need to do the same thing. Just keep your main triangle of machines together and everything else is negotiable. I think 10 X 12 is more room than you need for finishing though so you might want to use some of that space something else.

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