Roubo bench is ready to ride


tombuhl
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ROUBO OVERVIEW 2012

More pix may be found at: http://tombuhl.com/Gallery/Site/Roubo_Workbench_2012.html

I was torn over doing the Guild Build Roubo or working on a special desk project that I had already produced some element protytypes for. Complicating matters were two total knee replacement surgeries. One in late December and the other early April. After the second surgery, I decided that the bench was a better project for my healing and rehab time. Easy to break into components and consisted mostly of rectilinear shapes. The desk project would look simple when complete, but consists of compound angles and process feedback and memory that would be required to be active and juggled as I figured out how to proceed. That did not seem appropriate for my attention span at the time. So Roubo it was.

That being the case, I did want to simplify the bench build so that I could return to the fun projects on my list in a relatively short frame.

Design modifications to simplify the build included:

Round dog holes and dogs (rather than square)

Two 3/4 ply inserts for the lower shelf, mated with 45 degree miter at center meeting point.

Overall smaller size was a space consideration rather than time, but probably saved a bit of that as well.

Overall dimensions are: 75 inches x 21 inches x 34-1/2 inches

Did not make the sliding deadman. The smaller space between legs might lessen need. I did add the lower runner and upper groove, so that a deadman may be readily added later if I chose.

Did not sweat some of the fit and finish aspects which might have concerned me (see end grain cleanup or lack of) if this was to be a showcase bench.

Primarly used Ash as it was readily available in required sizes. But added some Hickory for a few elements when my Ash purchases (or cutting/measuring skills did not pass the test of reality). Also used some Cherry for Leg Vise Chop and End Cap (and deadman runner), just because I like Cherry.

Used two top slabs for handling and movement, but did not allow for a center fence/stop/tray.

Used lag screws (and mortise and tenons) to attach the End Cap rather than Condor Tails.

Did not place a dog hole over the right front leg. Time savings minimal, but something about that did not feel Buhl-like. Means I’ll need spacer(s) for short pieces, which I use in many situations anyway.

Willy, nilly added some “design” elements without creating a unified look.

I had built the BenchCrafted Moxon twin screw appliance after WIA 2011. Very pleased with that and use it frequently.

Big thank you to Marc and Aaron for their plans, videos and encouragement. Outstanding contribution to my project and enjoyment of the build.

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Very nice indeed. Can I ask what the steel handles at the base near the leg vise are for ?

Dave, are you referring to the 3/8 rod with Padauk handle? That is the pin to restrict location so that the Leg vise pinches and holds at the top.

Or perhaps opposite leg of the leg vise which has the two Grammercy holdfasts. Those are awesome for holding work on the top surface or on the leg as with the big hunk of Mahogany.

Or, if I'm missing the query, give it another post.

Thanks

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Looks great! How well does that wheel configuration work out?

The wheel configuration does not work without two people. I can lift an end, but the long overhang side is too far from the wheel bar for me to comfortably flip down/up the wheel bar. I do it at times, but not comfortably or consistently. I didn't want the wheels to lift it too far, so they do not clear the legs (as planned) but that means they can not swivel fully, which means they hang up. And the big issue is that one wheel bar will flip down when moving. Soooo, I have some re-engineering to do. For now it sits outside (because I like working outside) with tarp at night. So it is a work in process...as so many shop projects become.

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+1

Would love to see what you do with that slab...

I am working on converting it to a computer desk. Should be very cool looking if I can get my idea to work out. I'll try to post pix when it is complete. Cool thing is that I have two of those nifty planks. If mine works out I might build another for my wife. Or the second plank might have other ideas on what it wishes to become. We will see, but sure is an honor to work with fun materials.

btw, those two planks are old-growth, river-salvaged (from Belize River) Honduras Mahogany from Greener Lumber, LLC.

If you'd like to see some of the other projects I've made with that material, go to the link in my initial post (except the site is down tonight) and check out the OGHM Hall Table as well as the Stool w/Drawers (not sure exact link label).

Thanks

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Tom. I am aware of the items you mentioned. I was referring to what looks like metal handles on the left hand end near the base just above the casters.

If I’m understanding correctly, I believe those are the hinges for the flip-up castors which allows Tom to move his bench around.

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Thanks Onboard. I was using my smartphone to view and now that I am on my 30 inch monitor, it all becomes clear. Those casters actually flip right under the base....clever idea!

Dave,

You got it.

But I could have put handles down there so that you could lift it for me when you visit.

; )

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  • 3 months later...

I am working on converting it to a computer desk. Should be very cool looking if I can get my idea to work out. I'll try to post pix when it is complete. Cool thing is that I have two of those nifty planks. If mine works out I might build another for my wife. Or the second plank might have other ideas on what it wishes to become. We will see, but sure is an honor to work with fun materials.

btw, those two planks are old-growth, river-salvaged (from Belize River) Honduras Mahogany from Greener Lumber, LLC.

If you'd like to see some of the other projects I've made with that material, go to the link in my initial post (except the site is down tonight) and check out the OGHM Hall Table as well as the Stool w/Drawers (not sure exact link label).

Thanks

here is a photo of the desk from that large mahogany plank. Completed it this summer. Fun to look at...and touch.

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  • 3 years later...

Eric, those casters on the flip board did not work well. Wanted to flip up at wrong times.

I removed those and installed the Rockler flip casters. I had hesitated due to the screws holding to vertical face of legs which seemed weak. But they've held up for several years now. To lower the bench I use a crowbar. Not enough leverage for the beast to do it with foot power. To flip back up I remove a bit of weight from the corner, lift and push lever down with my foot. Works well. 

Most times I leave wheels down as I roll it into the driveway to work. If I'm doing heavy duty planing or sawing, then I put the wheels down. But it is pretty stable even on the wheels.

No video. I leave that to the young guys like Mark, Matt and Shannon.

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That really helps, Tombuhl! These are the ones I'm thinking of (though I'm still in the planning stages overall): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SX3T2LO/. I read in the questions for these casters that they're basically the same as the rocklers, so good to hear. 

I'm not sure I understand what you mean about lowering it with a crowbar. I think that lowering it would be my main worry about wheels - being sure to lower gently - I guess the question of whether it could warp the bench to have it up on one side's caster while lifting up or putting down. It'd be great if there were a way to put both of a side's casters up and down at the same time / with one mechanism. Thoughts? 

What about using casters like these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009ZDDLVI/, and putting a hole in the black tongue to attach a board that would connect the two casters on each side? That would avoid putting weight only on one at a time. I'm just thinking hypothetically, as I've never tried to manipulate one of these massive benches. What do you think?

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The Roubo is a robust hunk of bench so no issues (for me) with the lowering and raising one corner at a time. With first wheel raised the bench sort of balances on the three wheels. Lowering the other wheel at that end can create a thunk. That's why we use heavy and solid materials. It is not a large drop. I believe rated raise is 3/4 inch, if one had a level driveway. So it is not falling from great heights.

re: raising and lowering the legs. My description may have had some backwards components .

2nd attempt: I can't get enough oomph to lower the wheels by raising the lever by hand or with foot. So I use a crowbar (which is always on the lower bench shelf). End against ground (concrete driveway), side of bar snug to level edge or end and lift by hand. Works fine. Then to lower, I push the lever with my foot using leg power while holding a bit of the weight in that corner.

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