Lawrence Brown

Installing Tyvek in the rainy season?

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Okay, so this is more about construction than woodworking, but it's a question on building my shop, so I hope it's in the right place.

For those of you that have built your own shops (or other structures), I've got the basic structure built. The sheathing is up on the walls and there is a roof. Now it's time to put on the siding. Trouble is, we've now hit the rainy season. I can't do everything in one day, so the easiest way for me would be to put on the Tyvek house wrap all at once, and then add the siding over that as quick as I can.

The trouble is, I know it's going to rain in between these steps, so my question is, if I put the Tyvek up and it rains on it, as long as I let it dry off again before installing the siding (T1-11), will there be any problems or things I need to be concerned about?

The walls themselves will be dry when the Tyvek is applied. The little info I've found suggests that it doesn't matter because the moisture just eventually finds it's way out (when everything is done properly), but I just wanted to get the advice of others with more experience.

Any thoughts?

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......The little info I've found suggests that it doesn't matter because the moisture just eventually finds it's way out (when everything is done properly), but I just wanted to get the advice of others with more experience.

Any thoughts?

You're OK and spot on with your analysis. Proceed and have fun. Even a little water on the back side of the T 111 won't hurt anything, it'll reach equilibrium with the outside soon enough. The stuff's made as an exterior-grade product, as long as there's no direct water source(leak) behind it it'll stand up to most anything you can throw at it during installation.

Bill

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Thanks. I haven't used the T1-11 before, so I don't know it's characteristics. I was actually more concerned about the sheathing behind the Tyvek and the possibility of trapping moisture in it from direct rain on the Tyvek (I know it's not actually "waterproof", just resistant), but I guess that's the very reason why its used - so that the moisture can get out again.

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Tyvek is designed to breath. Also depending on your area and climate you might want to get the tyvek with the ridges on the backside. This allows areas that have dramatic tempeture changes and high moisture where wales to condansate to keep dry. Also do not worry about a little rain it will as said above equalize. Also T1-11 is an awesome product and supper easy to instal.

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