mds2

Home made planes

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I kind of started to hijack a critique thread so I thought this might be an interesting topic.

Are there many plane makers here? I don't know why but I really like making the silly little things. Even long before I knew how to use one.

Here is my most recent. I needed a jointer so I figured I could make a plane out of some scraps. The bed is at 45 degrees and it is about 15" long. Maybe a little short for a jointer, I have no idea.

Qgq9Ol.jpg

Please share your advice, photos, etc.

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Nice plane, I have never made one yet, but I would like to. There is one guy on this site that I know of that makes some very nice planes, and sells them Scott Meeks heres a link

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That is very nice. I cannot comment on the length as I also have no idea. What woods did you use?

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That one is made out of birdseye maple and padauk. I checked out Scott Meeks website. He makes some really nice planes. I really like the shape of them

Here are a few others that I have made.

DgMHQl.jpg

This one is cocobolo and maple. The plans for this came straight out of WOOD magazine. This is the second thing I ever made out of wood.

4JFQCl.jpg

This one is ziricote and bloodwood and cocobolo if I remember correctly.

AuQIHl.jpg

This one is lacewood and walnut.

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The small ones I have never used, believe it or not. I just never sharpened the blades. When I do need a plane I just grab my Stanley #4. The jointer I posted above I have used quite a bit in the last two days and I am very happy with it.

Those blades are Great Neck I think. I bought a bunch of them off of amazon for $2 a piece. I just started cutting them shorter to look better. I sharpen them on a $16 POS Stanley stone and they cut like a hot knife through butter. I would NOT recommend the stone I use though. It will be upgraded shortly.

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Those small ones are gorgeous. Like you I have a tendency to still reach for my #4 or low angle block plane. I have made a few, the first one is jatoba that I made for a friend of mine as a Christmas present a few years ago

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The second is bubinga that I made for myself. The black marks are from a sharpie that I used to make a profile template for the jatoba one because I forgot to make a template the first time :)

20120828134821-f336847d-me.jpg

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Jointers are typically from 22" all the way up to 36". Check out Philly Planes and Blum tools as well. Old Street (Clark and Williams) just retired from making some really great planes. I've been lusting after a D.L. Barrett and sons plough plane recently.

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mds2 those are beautiful planes!

How are you mounting the brass cross pin? Do you square up one side or does the round pin hold fine? I think I would like to have the brass accent on my next one.

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Round pins hold up fine with the friction fit, they don't tent to take a lot of lateral force so if they're snug at the outset they'll remain snug. The shaped pin in the second picture I put in is really for visual effect. A simple dowel will suffice for holding the iron and cap in place.

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mds2 those are beautiful planes!

How are you mounting the brass cross pin? Do you square up one side or does the round pin hold fine? I think I would like to have the brass accent on my next one.

I just drill a 1/4" hole and tap in the 1/4" brass rod with a hammer. It doesn't move and holds the cap and iron very tightly. I tap the cap in with a hammer and it gets a bit of a indention in it.

Kevin is there a rod through your shaped pin or is it solid wood?

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It's solid wood. I nibble the ends and use a plug cutter for part of it to me the ends round for the holes, then affix the cross pin during the glue up of the sides, but it's still a friction fit, it doesn't provide any more strength than a dowel, just appearance based.

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Has anyone here made low angle planes?

You cannot make a low angle bevel up plane out of wood. The bed will be too thin to support the blade/pressure from the wedge and the sole would bow out or break. "Low-angle" bevel down wooden planes can be made as low as about 40 degrees (I made a little wooden apron plane like this) but any lower and you risk blade clearance issues.

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I made another plane the other day. This one is rock maple and Osage orange. About 15" long. I really need to get a bench grinder so I can radius the iron, but it cuts pretty darn well.

QBqhc.jpg

Edit: arg image host is down.

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I love this thread!!! Not sure how I missed it the first time. Great looking planes mds!

As for low angle wood planes, I did attempt one at around 15º, believe it or not. It was bevel up.IMG_20110110_094959.jpgIMG_20110112_123732.jpg

It was a couple of years ago. Not very successful. I still have it, but if you breath too hard on the wedge, it wants to blow out the bottom. Not nearly enough wood under the front of the blade. I've thought about trying it again someday with a brass sole. Who knows.

That said, I make my Block Planes with approximately a 37º bed angle, which is still pretty low. It actually is the same as a low angle bevel up block plane. The low angle block has a bed angle of 12º, so that combined with a 25º bevel on the blade equals 37º. Just have to be careful when putting a microbevel on the blade, as if it is too steep, you will make the plane unusable.

FWIW, I am starting to teach wood plane making classes online. The first two classes are full, but if anyone is interested in knowing when the next ones will be, be sure to sign up for my newsletter in this post: http://www.scottmeekwoodworks.com/plane-classes

Scott

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Nice plane mds2 how many have you made to date? It looks like you got the fever.

I think 7 or 8 now.

Scott, how long have you been making planes? How did you get started? Any advice?

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I've been meaning to build a krenov style woody for quite some time, or even a toted smoother with an adjuster like the ones you see in Hayward's How to Build Woodwork Tools, or Wearing's Woodworker's Essential Shop Aids and Jigs . I also am a fan of the style of HNT Gordon's A55 Smoothing Planes, as well as the vintage Gage Co. transitional planes that Stanley later acquired.

I've read David Finck's book a while ago, and bought a 12/4 maple slab and some hickory for the sole. Every time I have $60 burning a hole in my pocket, I usually find something other than a Hock blade to spend it on. Someday soon once I get my shop in better order...

Scott- I read the details on your site. Your class sounds like a great opportunity, and a kick in the pants for people like me. I hope it goes well.

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