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I was looking on their website and I happened to run across the Veritas Skew Rabbet Plane....That could be a handy tool for when I don't want to dig out the router for a small job.... but the price is 240.00, Has anyone had a chance to use one of these to justify buying it over using the router... Sorry Pbmaster11 kind of got sidetracked, didn't mean to jack your post but i have a decent selection of planes some are good and some are so so. But everyone that i have bought from Lee Valley has worked flawlessly.

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I have the low angle block, the 7/jointer, medium shoulder plane, all veritas. all my others are pretty old stanleys of my grandfathers that I spent a TON of time refurbishing, none of which are nearly as nice as my veritas planes.

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I was looking on their website and I happened to run across the Veritas Skew Rabbet Plane....That could be a handy tool for when I don't want to dig out the router for a small job.... but the price is 240.00, Has anyone had a chance to use one of these to justify buying it over using the router...

Since I often make rabbet cuts, I took the plunge and, boy, does it work fantastic. Soon thereafter I had the chance to pickup a vintage woodie to do the same thing: it's nice and works but the LV just blows it away. Totally! I'm hooked.

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I've been really happy with everything I've got from Veritas and Lee Valley. I also have some LN planes and they are extremely high quality. But, I can imagine buying any shoulder plane other than the Veritas.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong here, but is there a shoulder plane anywhere that is better than the Veritas?

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Has anyone used the Veritas dovetail sawing guide? I was thinking about picking one up.

http://www.leevalley...718&cat=1,42884

I took a course from Bill Perry (at Lee Valley), and he made his own from scrap with a rare earth magnet in it. Cost hm about 50 cents. Regardless, he demonstrated how to do it without a guide, which I feel is a good way to do it. That being said, I am still practising my technique.

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I've been really happy with everything I've got from Veritas and Lee Valley. I also have some LN planes and they are extremely high quality. But, I can imagine buying any shoulder plane other than the Veritas.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong here, but is there a shoulder plane anywhere that is better than the Veritas?

Based on your second paragraph, and sanity, I believe you meant to say "I can't imagine buying..." cuz their shoulder plane is really nice with the rotating handle. I wanted a Veritas, but got a deal on a LN... it is on the corner of my desk right now being sold to a friend. So it was no deal. Get the Veritas shoulder if you get one.

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I took out my september issue of Lee Valley... makes my mouth water. I believe in the next couple months I will shell out 1k or so on a full set of planes.

Wow and here I thought you weren't going to get e anything for Christmas his year!! What are your goals you wish to accomplish and do you have any already? If I was starting from scratch (I am a hybrid woodworker) I would start with a rabbeting block plane for end grain and joinery finessing, #4 for removing any mill marks, #5 and #7 for working any surfaces to large for my jointer, and a Stanley router plane with a couple Veritas cutters for joinery finessing. I don't have a Veritas router but my Stanley works super for anything I through at it and has never left me wanting more. I am sure this puts you over the 1k mark and that is where knowing your goals and existing arsenal come into play. If I was starting over my first plane would be a LV, LN, or WR; something that would get me going and show me how the plane should act and what to expect, this takes the tool out of the equation when you are learning. After your feet are wet getting an old Stanley and Hock iron teaches you more about how the tool itself works and saves you some serous dough. I have a fleet of Stanleys that are equipped with some elbow grease and most have Hock irons. The adjustments aren't as smooth and the results may not be quite that of a high end plane but they get the job done very nicely and anyone who looks at my furniture can't tell if it was done with a $50 or a $500 plane. I am not against new nice planes, I have a #5 Woodriver and man do I love that thing but if I had to choose between a few really nice planes or a fleet of nice planes with a top dog plane, I am taking the latter, just my opinion.
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First off do you have a sharpening system? With out a method to sharpen your edges the most expensive tools are boat anchors.

I recently bought and fixed up a old #12 scraper plane with my kids, the more I use it the more I love it. Veritas has what seems to be a nice scraper plane. That being said one thing to consider is that it is much better to slowly step into new tool purchases for several reasons. #1 Since you seem to be new to hand planes due to your list, what if you don't like them? Now your stuck with a stockpile of nice planes that you are going to loose money on even though resale could be easy. #2 This is the biggest one in my opinion-learning to use many tools at once. Each tool I have bought works a little different and getting good results only comes as you get to know the tool, with a stack of new tools thats a lot of learning, forgetting, and confusion that has to take place. I would be willing to bet that the result of this is going to prolong your learning curve. #3 System overload from learning so many new tasks. Techniques such as dimensioning stock has a lot of lessons and tricks as well as time at the bench that are required to learn the process, trying to teach yourself dimensioning, joinery finessing, curved work, finish planing not to mention sharpening is a LOT to undertake all at once. When I first tried hand planes I had a few hand-me-down planes that needed serious tlc, no knowledge, and little understanding on sharpening. The result of this was failure. I walked away from hand planes for about 8yrs with my head hanging low. Luckily during that time the internet woodworking community and the handtool revolution kicked in and I returned with much different results. I am not trying to scare you away, I am sure you can make the transition to either galoot or hybrid with flying colors, but trying to undertake all this at once is like chasing a cow in a pasture with a fork and steak sauce because you are hungry, too much too soon can leave a very bad taste in your mouth. I would start with a plane or two that will help you get on your way, learn the ropes, then go back for seconds. Your choices in tools may dramatically change by then as well as your direction. Just something ou may want to consider.

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Not sure if you really need both a rabbet and a LA block plane or even a jointer plane for that matter. I don't have a powered jointer, I either buy my lumber S3S or run it through my planer with a planer sled and use my old stanley no. 5 to clean up the milling marks. My list would be different.

LA Block Plane

Smoother (No. 4, 4 1/2 or LVs BU smoother)

Shoulder Plane (medium)

Skew Rabbet Plane

Plough Plane (the LV one with all the blades and conversion kit)

I would also add an old Stanley No.5 for rough work.

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Nate makes some great points, many of us have been frustrated by what can be a steep leaning curve when it comes to not just hand planes but hand tools in general. IMO sharpening is by far the most important skill a woodworker can aquire when it comes to both hand and power tools, it also causes the most frustration when learing to master planes, chisels, hand saws, etc. I would agree that a low angle block, smoother and shoulder plane is a great place to start, these are by far the ones I reach for the most, as well as the Stanley 102 that resides in my apron.

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Nate makes some great points, many of us have been frustrated by what can be a steep leaning curve when it comes to not just hand planes but hand tools in general. IMO sharpening is by far the most important skill a woodworker can aquire when it comes to both hand and power tools, it also causes the most frustration when learing to master planes, chisels, hand saws, etc. I would agree that a low angle block, smoother and shoulder plane is a great place to start, these are by far the ones I reach for the most, as well as the Stanley 102 that resides in my apron.

I have to agree, I tried to go the all hand tool route and find myself in a miserable place. I like using hand tools but I hate doing a lot of milling by hand. I prefer to buy S3S stock or pay my lumber mill the extra .30 cents per BF to do it for me. Now joinery on the other hand is a different story there is nothing like using a plough plane to make a groove for a drawer instead of using the table or router.

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Okay I am thinking the following

Low angle block

Rabbit block

#4

Smoother

Jointer plane

Router

Set of 3 spoke shaves

Maybies

Shoulder plane

Scraping plane

Anything else I should add? Any particular models you suggest? I am thinking veritas?

The Veritas plow plane is amazing. I used one this weekend, and I will buy one soon.

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I was looking on their website and I happened to run across the Veritas Skew Rabbet Plane....That could be a handy tool for when I don't want to dig out the router for a small job.... but the price is 240.00, Has anyone had a chance to use one of these to justify buying it over using the router... Sorry Pbmaster11 kind of got sidetracked, didn't mean to jack your post but i have a decent selection of planes some are good and some are so so. But everyone that i have bought from Lee Valley has worked flawlessly.

Yes, fine tool. Couldnt do without it now.

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