BDY33

Absolute beginner, becoming frustrated

Recommended Posts

Been by there a couple of times, but it's further out than my usual runs go.  I'll head out that way next month and check them out, though.  Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just want to say that I too am an absolute beginner woodworker and I really appreciate this thread, which is what led me to create an account here - it's nice to know I won't be crucified for asking newbie questions here.  great forum guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

second post!  heh. and thanks, I will very likely have some questions soon, I've got an outdoor table and chairs that needs to be refinished (pretty sure it's cedar) and the table design (there are slats on top that are only a couple centemeters apart) is going to make it quite a project, particularly removing that old crappy finish... but I don't have pics yet so, later.  and thanks again for the welcome :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Relax. Take a breath. You are not going to have a pro shop overnight or maybe never. Tools are expensive, but so is space. Cabinet shops are a great resource. Craig's list is the best place to get tools. I stopped woodworking years ago and just started up again. I just got a delta hybrid saw for 400.00. With dado blade set inserts and a bunch of other extras. If you try to tackle this all at once you will go mad or broke or both. I just got a HF dust collector for 129 and built my own cyclone from a cardboard drum and a 40 kit from rockier. It works great. I also bought an air filtration unit for a couple hundred bucks. Hang in there buddy. If it was easy everyone would do it. Instead they buy from IKEA. It takes time to acquire good skills. The tools will just show up. Soon you will be swimming in them. Best of luck to you.

Trever Wise

WISEdesigns

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twise, I recently purchased the HF dust collector w/ the intent of revising it w/ a cyclone. Did you use the base that came w/ the unit? Do you have a pic of yours that you can post?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi. This is my first post. I'm also a novice woodworker. I started when finding wood on the street (old bookcase, futon). Somehow, I ended up with a cabinet/entertainment center. Not fancy, but it works!!! I always keep  my eyes open for toss outs and a friend just suggested I check out Goodwill and Salvation Army for some old items that could be refinished or transformed into something else. Start slow....spread the fun out by just getting the tools for your current job and gradually expand. It's always fun to go shopping! I've also invested in a subscription to ShopNotes which pays for itself! It's chockfull of great tips and ideas - with very clear drawings.

 

You are NOT alone! It's great to know that not everyone here has been at woodworking for years! Nice to have some company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With respect to encouraging others - and especially beginners, James Krenov said, "It has never been my belief that experience or professional knowledge is anyone's personal property. It has never occurred to me that if someone comes and asks me this or that, or wants to know how to do something or why one does it in a certain way,  that I would not take the time to answer the questions, if I can. I've picked up a bit of know-how, yes. Most of it has been used by craftsmen long before me. It is not my private knowledge, but rather it is my way of using what little I have learned that happens to be right for people like myself. It pleases me tremendously to know there are others who look at it likewise. Some of us craftsmen have periods of doubt and fear, and getting a bit of help, sharing information and feelings with other people can, at those times, make the difference between getting on with one's work with enjoyment or slipping into discouragement and confusion, which can end in resignation." --James Krenov, The Impractical Cabinetmaker

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is true. Garage woodworking is a game of inches! You just keep expanding very slowly, and before you know it, you're running the garage.

t more true words have never been spoken I started out splitting the garage with my wife. At this point in time I traded her an entire bedroom in the house for her half the garage so yes you are correct I do run the garage it just cost me a lot more than. I thought it would .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just in Lowe's today and saw they had what looked like a contractor's table saw by Delta that was half contractor saw half cabinet saw for like $500.

 

My only saving grace for buying tools is that I am a contractor and do some custom furniture project maybe once or twice a year for clients.  So I get to write all my stuff off.  Guess I should be all festooled up but naw, pockets aren't that deep.

 

Craigslist is great, so are garage sales and estate sales.  Just do a lot of surfing and make sure you know how much things cost.  Oh and stroll home depot once a month because randomly they have some killer deals.  Mostly on clamps but you can never have enough clamps.   I bought a lot of my stuff of another salesman in our roofing office when he wrapped up his home building business and got a Grizzly cabinet saw with 54" extension and a great fence AND a grizzly dust collector AND 4, 2.5" thick slabs of fir (two of which he hit a bullet with his mobile saw and the bullets fragments are still in the wood)

 

Deals are out there.  Just be patient and get the best you can afford.  But seriously, stop in lowes or home depot.   OH OH OH,  I was in a home depot randomly when they carried in store their table saws, drill presses and jointers and picked up the last of the ridgid 4" jointers that they carry online for $500 for $200!!!!!!!!! AFTER TAX! SOLD!!!!!  They wanted it out of their store.   it works great and hasnt disappointed me yet!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in eastern kansas and im unaware of any ideal lumberyards around these parts...

I have a guy that has a portable sawmill.  What do you want?  Walnut cut to whatever thickness you want for $1.5 per board foot?  The whole tree slabbed out at 3.5"   Quarter sawn Sycamore (you cant have that, it's mine)   Let me know, He's in Meridan KS.  I'll gladly drive 8 hours for that, plus I have family in Topeka.   The only problem is if he cuts it on site, you have to help (problem really? wink wink)  and you have to dry it.   I have an entire american elm tree cut into 3.5" slabs that have been drying for 3 years and Im ready to tool it up.   He does have 10-20k board foot of walnut that has air dryed for 10 years plus.  Cherry, Coffee bean, white and red oak.     Oh did anyone else feel the tingle going up your leg?    Drop me a line and I would be happy to pass his info along.  He has hundreds of trees just laying around waiting to be cut and yes I did say $1.5 per board foot.     The best wholesale price for walnut is $2.99 per board foot!!! WHOLESALE!!!!!!

 

Get the tissues and wipe the drool off your mouth!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

post-16619-0-59024000-1420787091_thumb.jpost-16619-0-34697300-1420787093_thumb.jpost-16619-0-92513800-1420787094_thumb.j

 

post-16619-0-51660700-1420787472_thumb.jHere is the before picture of the tree he cut for me and some of the figured walnut that he gave me.  Got half a pickup load for $50.  Yes I said $50.  mostly 6' and under but.  YES I SAID $50!!!)  Dark walnut figured, lots of character.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a guy that has a portable sawmill. What do you want? Walnut cut to whatever thickness you want for $1.5 per board foot? The whole tree slabbed out at 3.5" Quarter sawn Sycamore (you cant have that, it's mine) Let me know, He's in Meridan KS. I'll gladly drive 8 hours for that, plus I have family in Topeka. The only problem is if he cuts it on site, you have to help (problem really? wink wink) and you have to dry it. I have an entire american elm tree cut into 3.5" slabs that have been drying for 3 years and Im ready to tool it up. He does have 10-20k board foot of walnut that has air dryed for 10 years plus. Cherry, Coffee bean, white and red oak. Oh did anyone else feel the tingle going up your leg? Drop me a line and I would be happy to pass his info along. He has hundreds of trees just laying around waiting to be cut and yes I did say $1.5 per board foot. The best wholesale price for walnut is $2.99 per board foot!!! WHOLESALE!!!!!!

Get the tissues and wipe the drool off your mouth!!!!!

am I understanding correctly that you bring him the trees and he cuts it for 1.50 or he has trees on site he will cut down for you for 1.50/ bf? Either way, That's an awesome find. Wish it was closer to California.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said maybe bypass the jointer for now. A good table saw can be jigged to joint boards and then utilize a planer sled to joint the face. Marc, I think, shows how to do this in a video. Also, woodwork when weather permits and roll you equipment outside and this will cut down your dust collector needs, make sure you wear a respirator (fairly inexpensive in comparison). Also, as others have said, make nice with your hardwood dealer and they may be able to help you out. Good luck and happy woodworking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Maybe you are over thinking it a little... I started getting my woodworking hobby a little at a time. I bought most of my equipment from "Kijiji" (craigslist in the U.S.A). Many wood workers always want to upgrade their gear, so they will sell the old stuff at a great price. Most of the people I met were real nice and even threw in a few extra items (sanders, jig saw etc). Sometimes the old tools and equipment were of great quality and designed to last forever. I increased my tools and equipment a little at a time and have also out grown my space. I do not have any ventilation equipment, just kind of wing it with opening the door and a dust mask. Probably, not the best solution.

 

I hardly ever buy new wood. I try and get wood from re-stores, garage sales, kijiji (craigslist), home re-purpose stores and even big box stores usually have a pile of bad wood at a big discount. I get the most enjoyment of finding an dirty old oak 4" x 4" timber and cutting and planing it to something amazing. I have become decent at stripping some real aweful wood to find some beautiful 1/4 cut grain.

 

I wish you all the best.

 

Jaret

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mostly, what you plan on making will determine your  level of equipment. I make some jewelry boxes and clocks. Nothing bigger. A decent table saw with a really good blade and rockler sled and other items to make sure you cut straight and square. A bosch router and table and a bosch palm router. A small band saw with a good olsen blade. You can really make lower price equipment perform well with some upgraded attachments. Don't give up. I'm old.Wish I had started this 50 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There has been a lot of wisdom scared in this thread already and I'd just like to share a few thoughts. You said you wanted to get into woodworking all your life. The good news is that, having built a bench and a couple of projects, you are indeed a woodworker!

My first bench was also made from dimension lumber. The base was made from 4x4's and 2x6's mortised and tenoned based on an episode from the Woodwrights shop. The top was simple 2x6's laided flat. I have since replaced the top with maple but the base is still the same. I was sure I would have replaced it 20 years ago but I still haven't (yet).

That being said, I have built a bunch of projects on the bench. That's what I would encourage you to do, just get building. Not many of us look back in pride at our early work. I have begged my wife to let me burn a cradle I made for our oldest child. I look at it now with sentimental embarrassment but my wife still loves it. 

You'll never have all of the tools you want and you'll probably want to upgrade the tools that you do have. Enjoy your time in your shop, keep learning, watch Craig's List, and most importantly have fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jumping in with too feet eh? one thing I wold suggest, you don't need to go crazy an buy all the tools to outfit a shop in one big swoop, learn to master the hand tools first, this is where the real wood working begins, and most times ends, sure a table saw and joiner and all the other tools make it easy to produce something quickly, learning how to master using your hand tools will take away much frustration, buying lumber at a mill, most mills will offer up planing for a few bucks and will still be cheaper than Lowes or H/D prices, also try some of the smaller lumber yards, I found wood there cheaper by a large margin,  Also don't be afraid of buying used tools, most times you can get a good quality tool for less than half the price of a new one, One thing I would not go cheap on is my hand tools a good shooting plainer is worth it's weight in gold, as well as a good square, 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone.  

I hope BDY33 doesn't mind me hijacking his thread for a newbie question of my own.  I have read through this post and seen everyone's advice about buying the different tables slowly as you go and not to be afraid of the hand tools.  That is an awesome idea.  My question is about those bigger tables.  In my search around the internet and mainly youtube, I have seen a couple places that show you how to build your own tables from scratch.  You just have to buy their plans which are no more expensive than a good book.  These include making your own table saw, a lathe, a jointer, a band saw, and a router table.  All made from wood (in some demos nothing but scrap wood) and just as good as the mid range store bought stuff if not better because you will know how to repair it and have more pride in it.  Most that I have seen seem like a major score for a beginner.  You can learn the basics and increase your own tool box.  My question to the more experienced is what do you think of these DIY tables and the quality of the work for a beginning hobbyist?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I understand correctly, you are referring to one of the many solutions that usually incorporate a job-site table saw into a surrounding workbench, then add shop built tools like band saws and lathes. I'm sure some decent work can be accomplished by going that route. However, I feel that you would achieve much better results, with vastly diminished frustration, by starting with a better foundation. By that, I mean save up for a good tablesaw, or maybe a decent bandsaw and hand tools. The difference in cut quality, and accuracy (not to mention safety) between a portable job site saw and even a lower priced cabinet saw is tremendous. If machining wood is your thing, almost any task can be accomplished with a good tablesaw, and the proper work-holding jig. If more traditional work appeals to you, a good bandsaw can save a ton of boring grunt work prepping your stock.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the world of woodworking and keep your chin up. You could spend your money on tools but don't.

I have a good table saw. But mine is a Craftsman from the 1940s and it works great. I paid @200 for it. When I got the money I spent another $200 and bought a really good fence. That saw does everything I need.

I bought a good planer on sale for another $200.

I built lecterns for Toastmasters and paid for everything here plus some nice wood from a cabinetmaker who was retiring. That was an ad I saw in the newspaper. I wish I had seen it the first week it ran in the paper. 

   These are my primary tools and they do everything I need. I have several hand power tools that I have gotten along the way or gotten as gifts but they just make life easier.//hand tools would do the same thing or just doing things by hand! Don't forget you are learning to do woodworking and this is a great time to be creative.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check in your area to see if there are places where you'd be able to use tools which you don't have. In this area, there's a "co-op" that charges less than $75/month for use of a very well equipped shop area, outfitted mainly with industrial grade equipment. Perhaps the local school system in your area makes some of their facilities available after school hours? Check with the local woodworkers' stores (Rocklers, Woodcraft. etc) to see if they can refer you to what you're looking for.

While you're building up an assortment of plug-in toys, take advantage of the time to work on your hand work capabilities.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The transition you are talking about is a big one and not easy, but with patience it will happen. with every project you do buy a tool if you can. You will start to see the savings when you can make a dining table instead of buy one. Take those savings and put them back into the shop. It could take literally years before you have the tools needed to make a set of cabinets on the power tool end of things. Of course you could always buy a crosscut panel saw, a dovetail saw and some planes and there you go, but if you are like me I like to plug some things in. Don't get disheartened it will come, just be diligent and frugal and make wise tool purchases. There is nothing worse than being impatient and buying a crap tool only to regret it later. Best of luck and I hope it goes well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.