jgfore

Powermatic Dust Collector Model 73

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I have found a used Powermatic DC Model 73 on craigslist for $125.00. I can not find much about this model since it has been discontinued. I am assuming that it being Powermatic, it should be a pretty good machine. I do not know what micron the bag is on top. If anyone has any info or experiance with this DC please let me know. I have been realy needing one, and this sounds like a good one for the money.

Thanks Jeff

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I don't have experience with the powermatic but I will say this. Look at the CFM it has and if it's anywhere near 900+ get it. For $125 you will not have any regrets. I went years only using a shop-vac and I will never go back to that again. The shop-vac did not move enough air to keep up with any tool in my shop. I couldn't run more than a few boards on my jointer before I had to clear out the dust port. I stopped even bothering hooking the thing up to my table saw, instead opting to clean it out every other week. BUT NOW!!! I have a shopfox 1685 I bought off of Amazon and could not be happier. I will eventually upgrade the bag but it is a world of difference. My table saw cabinet is clear of dust, my jointer hums along without having to stop to clear the dust port. Hell, even just putting the pipe near my lathe picks up a lot of the shavings!

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I don't have experience with the powermatic but I will say this. Look at the CFM it has and if it's anywhere near 900+ get it. For $125 you will not have any regrets. I went years only using a shop-vac and I will never go back to that again. The shop-vac did not move enough air to keep up with any tool in my shop. I couldn't run more than a few boards on my jointer before I had to clear out the dust port. I stopped even bothering hooking the thing up to my table saw, instead opting to clean it out every other week. BUT NOW!!! I have a shopfox 1685 I bought off of Amazon and could not be happier. I will eventually upgrade the bag but it is a world of difference. My table saw cabinet is clear of dust, my jointer hums along without having to stop to clear the dust port. Hell, even just putting the pipe near my lathe picks up a lot of the shavings!

Well, I have justed added my first DC to my shop. I can only run it for about 1-2 secs before it blows the breaker, so I am running new 110v and 220v receptical to my shop. Then I will convert it to 220V andit will be GREAT! It runs SOOO quite, and pulls 1200 CFM. The only problem is that I do not know what the Microns are of the bag. Anyways, I am happy with it.

Jeff

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