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    • I'm going to grab wood thus morning for the drawers. I'm second guessing myself on the thickness to get. The lower drawer is about 12" deep, 12" front to back, and 29.5" wide. The upper drawer is the same dimensions except only 6" deep. There will be overlaid fronts on the drawer boxes of solid birch. I was originally going to get 1/2" Baltic birch plywood for the sides/front/back and 1/4" for the bottoms. Is that strong enough, or should I be using 3/4"? I was also thinking about going up to 1/2" for the bottom of the big drawer, in case someone stood in it. I expect most of the time these will have toys in them. If it matters, I got 100 lb full extension slides to install them.
    • No leg required. Attach the 1x material to the wall. Notch out each cabinet so the 1x material is part of the back.
    • http://www.rockler.com/surface-mount-corner-brackets-for-table-aprons
    • Trying to finish up the base.  This is the current state.  I added curves to the vertical parts of the trestle members and the lower stretchers.  The vertical parts have through mortises for the lower stretchers.  The biggest lesson learned from cutting those curves was that I overestimated my ability to operate a jig saw with thick material.  I already knew that I should have a bandsaw for cuts like those, and this experience did nothing but reinforce that.  Unfortunately, I do not have the space for a bandsaw at this time. The most recent change was to add the upper stretchers with lap joints.  These parts are the first that are not red oak to this point (southern yellow pine).  The idea is that these would be hidden by the top.  I am embedding t-nuts in the top of the trestles for 1/4-20 fasteners that pass through the upper stretchers. The only task left for the base (other than sanding and finishing) is to create the vertical mortises in the lower stretchers and the wedges that will pass through these mortises and press against the outer surfaces of the vertical parts of the trestle members.  The plan is to use cutoffs from the cherry for the top to make the wedges.  I am a little nervous about cutting the mortises because (1) I don't want to mess up the lower stretchers and (2) I have never cut angled mortises.  I guess only one of the four faces of those mortises needs to be angled, but still... After the mortises/wedges, I will start milling the 8/4 cherry for the top.  
    • In any case when cutting plastic with power tools, be prepared for static-charged chips that never go away!
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