Product Reviews


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  5. Baileigh Machines

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  6. Bosch GET75-6N 6" ROS

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    • I've upholstered a couple of simple square foam seats before, but this was my first shot at something substantial, with curves and springs and welted cushions and all the rest. As for learning ... youtube all the way ... there's loads of people making vids of reupholstering chairs and cushions. It's not quite as complicated as it looks once you get going ... and sewing has similarities with woodwork: at it's most basic it's just cutting raw stock down to shape, and then a bit of joinery to attach the pieces together. The hardest part was actually the design of the skeleton, knowing where it needs gaps in the woodwork that the fabric can go through and be pulled tight, and where it is important to have a piece of wood for the staples to go into, and where wood is needed to hold the shape, and where it is better to stretch webbing or use foam for a softer shape etc. Nobody seems to talk about that, so I had to mentally picture myself doing the upholstery on my couch before I had even built the frame in order to know how to build the frame that I had to mentally picture to understand the upholstery, it was a bit of a vicious circle ... but I seem to have got there in the end.
    • That's an amazing project.  How long have you been doing upholstery and are you self taught or did you take some classes.
    • I really like the simple elegance of this table.
    • Thanks guys ... yes it is very comfortable ... but now winter is over, I don't have excuses for staying indoors and using it. For sure. You may have noticed in some of the photos I also made a matching footstool, so I could practise any unfamiliar techniques before making expensive mistakes on the couch. I ended up making six legs for the footstool out of 8/4 cherry before I got four the same, and the technique reliable enough to try on the couch legs ... there are still the scars from a few catches that I didn't try to completely remove because it would reduce the bead too much, just have to keep them facing away from the front and nobody will know.
    • The technique seems awfully similar to hammer veneering but with the drawbacks of not getting to adjust much. Have you thought about trying hammer veneering in situations like you outlined above? There is also the PVA iron on method that seems interesting and could have some promise in situations where possible edge peeling is limited. For those that aren't familiar the PVA iron on method is as follows. Coat both the veneer back and substrate with pva glue 2-3 layers and let it dry. Shortly after it dries position the veneer and use a warm-hot iron to reactivate the glue and attach the veneer to the substrate.
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