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Rex Edgar

JDP 17 Floor Model Drill Press

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A floor model drill press has been one of those tools that I have lusted after for as long as I can remember. Well we finally pulled the trigger on the daily new JET 17" floor model. Another member, Ryan Grondin purchased the bench model of this drill and I'm not sure if he has reviewed it. My drill was delivered 1SEP16 and was well packed compared to some of the tools I have purchased from JET. Assembly is straight-forward, I was able to muscle the table on the support shaft, but needed neighborly help to oust the head assembly. The manual states, in no uncertain terms that the press IS NOT to be mounted on a mobile base. I have to be able to move things around my shop, so on the mobile base it went. I must sat that with out the base the machine is a little easy to wobble on a level floor without the mobile base. I am in the process of building a multi drawer base to mount to the foot and with accessories in the drawers, it should add some mass near the floor. 

My first impressions are favorable. The lasers are not spot on, but close. The speed adjustment is fairly simple, two belts around two adjustable pulleys and one idler pulley. The included chuck is low quality and I will be looking to upgrade to a Jacobs model in the near future. My issue is with the chuck and key, in that when I went to drill a small hole in the chuck key, so as to attach it to the machine, the bit retreated into the chuck, even though I tightened it as much as I could. There is no good place to attach the key, even on a lanyard. Just below the manufacturers plate, there is a threaded hole that houses an Allen bolt to secure the head. (One of two). I drilled the key and a 10mm bolt and used a nut as a stip to secure the lanyard with the key. For the money, 

$ 739.00 from Amazon, I have to say, so far, I am pleased. As I was drilling the Chuck key for the lanyard, I was thinking how far I have come as far as expectations with a drill. As a young man I had even less patience than I have now, (if possible), piece to be drilled in a vise and some oil for cooling and light pressure and slow speed prevailed. In the earlier days there was much cursing, broken drill bits and failed holes. I'll report further as my time and experience call for. I would recommend this drill.......Grade upper B.....given the need for a quality chuck to add to the cost of the drill. Would appreciate an option when purchasing of upgrading the chuck to Jacobs.

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How about an update?

What has been your experience with the mobile base?

Did you upgrade the chuck, and how did that go?

Do you use the machine with drum/spindle sander attachments or anything like that, or strictly to bore holes?

What else?  Are you pleased with the machine?

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Pondhockey,  Make sure the ice is thick enough, been an unseasonably warm winter to this point. I am still pleased with the Jet drill press. I built a three drawer cabinet for the base and am pleased that most of my bits and acccessories are within reach. I did update to a Jacobs chuck. The only downside to that is the smallest diameter bit that will chuck is 1/8". I have a Dremel with a vertical stand for those holes with  smaller diameter. I added the Woodpecker's table and fence. I was too lazy to fabricate one and couldn't find a base cabinet base pre made that fit my needs. One of the things that could be better is the lock handle for the height adjustment of the table. It is one of those spring loaded plastic handle that pulls out to loosen/tighten the threaded lock screw. The handle is situated in an awkward place and interferes with the table. As far as my needs, the drill seems to be accurate as far as 90 degrees to the table. The motor operates smoothly and the changing of speeds is simple to address. I have found that the shop made base adds some wieght to the base, giving me more confidence as far as the unit being top heavy. The base could be larger, but then there would be packaging and shipping issues. All in all, I am well satisfied and would recommend this to a colleague. Hope this helps. If you have more specific questions, feel free.

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With the drawers full of tools you should be ok. I wouldn't use the drill much without locking /raising the wheels.

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Rex, great review and cabinet base. I've found this from HF to be indespenible for holding my chuck key. The magnet holds it to the machine and holds the key inside it.Pittsburgh® Automotive 90566 4" Magnetic Parts Holder

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Nice update, Rex.  Thank you.

One question went unanswered, so I'll motivate it:  many online tools use a drill press to either

a) serve as a spindle sander (etc.)

b)serve as a lathe (spin the work.)

I'm suspicious about this but also curious as it would guide my next purchase if the drill press could also double as a sander and a lathe(!)  

Hence I'd like to know if you've tried any such "abuse" of the drill press involving lateral pressure against the chuck, and what you've experienced as a result.  (Did it work, satisfactorily and does the drill chuck wobble more?)

Edited by Pondhockey
spell check misbehavior

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IMG_3149.JPGI have a free standing lathe and a circular sander, so I can't speak from experience. I do have a small diameter (1-1 1/2") sanding drum attachment. It is my opinion that you should be able to finish sand an item. I wouldn't exert a heavy lateral pressure on a Morse taper.As far as securing the key, this is what I stole from someone else.

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On 2/12/2017 at 1:45 AM, Pondhockey said:

Nice update, Rex.  Thank you.

One question went unanswered, so I'll motivate it:  many online tools use a drill press to either

a) serve as a spindle sander (etc.)

b)serve as a lathe (spin the work.)

I'm suspicious about this but also curious as it would guide my next purchase if the drill press could also double as a sander and a lathe(!)  

Hence I'd like to know if you've tried any such "abuse" of the drill press involving lateral pressure against the chuck, and what you've experienced as a result.  (Did it work, satisfactorily and does the drill chuck wobble more?)

I've had this drill press for 2 years now. I would strongly advise against using any drill press for spindle sanding as adding lateral pressure will cause a significant amount of runout over time. The tool is not meant to do that, get a spindle sander and use the right tool for the job. 

 

Here's my review of this drill press from 2 years ago.

 

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13 minutes ago, Tom Cancelleri said:

I would strongly advise against using any drill press for spindle sanding as adding lateral pressure

The other thing that happens with the drum kits that are designed for the drill press is that the smaller diameter drums are also shorter.  So if you are trying to sand a real small inside curve the drum will barely work on something as thin as 3/4"  because you can't have the drum right against the drill press table.  There are some nice spindle sanders out there for $150 or so, you'll be a lot happier. 

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