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    • Just think of the quarters you saved those two days! 
    • I think I would tend to do something like Ross mentions.  I would want it pretty well secured just in case.  It sounds like you want the option of removing it from the wall down the road.  What about a horizontal sliding dovetail or even two.  If you had the dovetail stand away from the wall you could end up with the appearance of the rack floating in the air. 
    • This morning, I was able to get the new bushings in the front axle body.  It weighs every bit of 200 pounds, so I had to go carefully slow, working by myself in this isolation.  I was able to roll it around on a moving dolly. I had cut up some leftover scraps of 4x6 into cribbing, figuring I could jump up each of the three "corners", one at the time, by myself.  That actually worked great.  I could not have done this job, by myself, safely without the cribbing.  It was actually kind of fun having to figure it out, and being able to take what time I needed. Some of the cribbing blocks allowed me to get it into position at the shop press, to press in the largest bushing.  I had tried to tap it in without the press, but was having an impossible time keeping it straight, and once it got crooked, there was no straightening it back out.  I'd have to knock it out with a dead blow hammer, and try again.  Once I got it set up on the press, the bearing went right in. The small diameter bushing on the front pivots inside another bushing in the tractor frame.  The front of that axle casting was too long to get in the press, but being a small diameter, it was much easier to get lined up so I could pound it in with the 2 pound stone hammer, and some press dies.  I stood it against the press, with the back end on the floor, and that went right in too. I got lucky on the big bushing in the frame, and first lick with the dead blow hammer sent it straight enough to finish with a couple of press dies, and the 2 pound hammer. Then I rolled the axle into position under the front of the tractor, installed the bell crank, and started stacking the cribbing, and jumping up each corner.  It took me three hours to do all these steps, but I went back to the house to each lunch, and the main axle casting was in the tractor. I had to get Pam to come help me get the axle ends on.  I could have done it by myself if I had taken the wheels off, but I called her away from what she was working on, and in fifteen minutes, we had some bolts in each side holding the axle ends on. I spent another couple of hours hooking up the new tie rod ends, and aligning the front tires.  This is the first time, since I've owned this tractor, that there is no slop in the front end. The mixed up, for the second time, order of new hydraulic lines is supposed to be here Wednesday, so I might actually get to see if it all works this week.  
    • People who marvel at the pyramids of Egypt have never met a woodworker with a new (large) tool. There is ALWAYS a way to "Git 'er done!"
    • Nice solution! I enjoy hearing how other folks solve problems with what they have on hand. Always a new trick to learn.
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