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  2. Shaper Origin

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  4. 4 Axis CNC?

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  5. CNC Philip Morley Mortiser

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  6. Calibration question

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    • The wood shrinkage calculator at WoodWeb says that species should shrink or expand by 1/16" with a 6% change in MC. I think "Old-Timers" would have simply nailed the molding on, and trusted the flexibility of the nailed joint to keep the panel from doing any real damage. And nails can be replaced as needed.
    • Framing solid wood is always a cautionary tale.  As the panel gets wider the concern increases.  It looks like you are going for a dish effect (outer edge taller than the table surface).  Is the 26" the long grain direction?   I avoid framing solid panels but, even in my breadboards I use something like your option #2.  I attach the front to keep that look constant throughout the seasons and allow the rear to move.  Minnesota has actual seasons so I imagine you get decent humidity swings.  Using option #2 you could see gaps of up to 1/8" at the rear miter joint.  If this will pass muster I would go that way.  For more peace of mind I would go with your #3 or simply profile the edge.  Both make a significant change to the look of the piece. JMHO ;-)
    • I think the #3 option has an interesting look and would be a problem solver. 
    • I am bout to glue up the top for a 26" x 12" table.  I am using African Mahogany purchase from cabinet shop (good stuff) The end grain on a board laid flat on the workbench is straight upa nd down (quarter sawn or may be even rift cut.  I was planing to border the top with a shaped moulding similar to what one would see around the edges of a Queen Anne tes table. (mitered at the corners)  Then it occured to me that I could have movement problems witht he mouldings at the ends of the table.  I think I have 3 options. 1.  Just build it and and hope that 12" of rift cut mahogany won't move enough to noticably cause problem at the miters.  It is my understanding that this Species is quite stable to begin with and rift cut is even better. 2.  Glue the front 3" of the moulding on the ends and pin nail near the back corners to allow movement and let the back miters move. 3.  Design the moulding so that there is an intentional 1" or so gap in the moulding in the middle of the 12" long moulding on each end of the table.  See sketch. How would you do it?  
    • I did a sashay this morning and it happened to be my jointer. Caused me to laugh and think about this. I am sure that a very high percentage of woodshops are not big enough. And most know the dance steps required. And wish for more space. Me included. But I am grateful to have my shop. It does my heart good to see on occasion someone worthy have a killer shop that dancing is not required but aloud.
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