MidWest US

Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

68 topics in this forum

  1. Hello from KC area

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  2. Minneapolis area?

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  3. Independence, MO

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  4. Hello from Ohio

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  5. Dayton OH area

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  6. Hello from Iowa

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  7. Hello from Chicago

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  8. Hi from KC

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  9. Hello from Michigan

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  10. rough sawn lumber in Indianapolis, in

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  11. INDIANAPOLIS

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  12. Buying hand tools in MN?

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    • With plywood like that, cut the dados across one large sheet before ripping into the smaller sections. That makes the outside pieces the same. For the center piece, have it already cut to width, then as you cut each dado into the side pieces, cut the dado on one side of the center, then flip it over and cut the other side. Make each cut on all 3 pieces before moving your fence or stop block to the next cut position.  If using a router in hand, make the first dado across all the pieces in on pass. Cut a scrap to fit tightly in the dado, and use it to hold the boards in alignment while cutting the remaining dados, using a spacer as needed to offset the router from the alignment piece. For side 2 of the center piece, flip it over and align the ends of all 3 pieces. Use 2 scraps to fit the dados in the outer pieces, and register the spacer against them, to cut the second thru last dados in the center, then come back and get the first, spacing from the alignment piece in the second dado.
    • The biggest changes are: Marc is more gray. Shannon is more slender. Matt has more kids. Otherwise, its pretty much the same!
    • This is true of many of us.  That is why making a bunch of jigs ahead of time is a lot like buying a "set" of router bits.  You will end up with a bunch of items that you never use.  Storing jigs can become its own nightmare in very short order.  When you are planning for a project, if a jig will help you, build it first ;-) A crosscut sled for the tablesaw is a pretty sure bet.  It is hands down the most used jig in my shop.  It allowed me to recover the massive footprint required by a SCMS or a RAS.  A decent table and fence for your drill press is another winner for most folks.  I use the heck out of a tenon jig but, other folks could care less.  I do a lot of sliding dovetails and so have a sled for the router table that makes this quick and accurate.  On the other hand I do not do a lot of dovetail panel joints (drawers, carcasses) so I generally just do those by hand. A mention on t-track.  I fortunately started out using Rockler's Universal track.  I didn't realize I was being smart at the time since that is not my normal behavior ;-)  This track takes 1/4" hex, 1/4" t-bolts/nuts and 5/16" t-bolts and nuts.  This means all my Incra, toilet-bolt, Rockler, Lee Valley, etc. stuff is usable in all the tracks. I also use the Micro Jig Match-fit clamps.  This is rapidly taking over my use of t-tracks for jigs and fixtures that use holddowns.  T-track is still the way to go for many jig functions though.  As always, YMMV.  
    • I have the grizzly two bag 3hp dust collector got it for a steal from a out of business deal.  and I have piping through out he shop to all my major machines.  my lathe/miter has a dedicated 1hp collector mounted to the wall behind lathe. and I have  small shop vac behind my drill press to collect dust and shaving when I need to use it.  don't need as much so its not part of my dust collection system. been cleaning my garage last couple of days after I get it looking decent ill take some pictures to post to the forum.
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