Digital Design

A place to discuss all forms of digital design.


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  1. Sketchup vs. ?? 1 2

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  2. Fusion 360 tutorials

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  4. just for fun

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  5. Sketcup line color?

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  6. Drawing a twisted block

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  7. Sketchup 2018

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  10. Roundover on Knob

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  11. wood species

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  12. How best to learn Sketchup? 1 2

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    • That 'really wrong' patch looks to me as if a veneer was sanded through. Commercial pieces like that are often constructed of solid wood, but overlaid with a veneer of higher quality and better appearance. If that truly is a veneer, replacing it, or covering it with a decorative inlay, are the only options I can think of.
    • @Coop, I borrowed that technique from a method used to make bowls with a scroll saw, and modified it slightly. 
    • @Chestnut, here are the angles and drops that I ended up with. From the front of the seat to the back it's a 4 degree drop, which is effectively an 1.5" drop. The angle of the seatback to the seat is 8 degrees, resulting in a recline angle of the back to the floor of 102 degrees. What I'd tweak on this is a 2" drop and a final back angle to the floor more in the 105 range. My design, which I liked so much, made me come up with these above angles. But I did want more of an upright couch rather than a reclining one you sink into. I think with couches you could be between 100-110 degrees and be fine, with a 115 not out of the question. To me increasing the drop seems to always help with comfort. As for webbing in the seat I was concerned with integrity and strength in the piece. Webbing does give you some strength but the wood slats are stronger. Webbing likely would have worked though, and it would have made the seat more forgiving. You are right, we do tend to over build.  
    • Hi guys, I'm new here and relatively new to woodworking, I just picked up some lane pieces today and was looking to restore them. They've all got standard scratches water stains etc but on the coffee table there's a large patch that looks really wrong. I was thinking it might have been a really terrible woodfill fix but I'm unsure. If anyone could help ID what happened and how to fix it I'd appreciate it. Also this is my first wood restoration project of any kind so any tips, guides or products to look for would be very helpful thanks!
    • The track needs to extend beyond the length of your work some.  With only using 2 55 inch tracks that overhang would only be about 7 inches at both ends, so when you place the saw on the track and start it you would already be at the beginning of your work.  I prefer being able to start the saw, plunge it down and then move into the work. Coop if you thing the TSO guide is pricey look at Woodpeckers version. I have been very thankful to have the track saw a number of times not involving Ply.  The current bed build I did all the cuts both rip and cross cuts with the track saw when making the side rails.  Final dimensions of those are 86 inches long  In my shop I couldn't rip or do the cross cuts because of lack of space around the table saw so I did it all using the track saw.
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