Introduce Yourself

Tell your fellow forum members who you are, where you hail from, and what type of woodworking you like to do.


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  2. Returning to the hobby

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  3. Newbie Here

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  4. New from Germany

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  6. Introduction

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  7. Hello there!

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  9. Hello from AZ

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  10. Hello from NC

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  11. Chicagoan Here

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  12. Hello from Denver, NC!

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  13. Hello from Texas

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  14. Hi from Australia

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    • The bottom edges are smoothed. There wasn’t much further shaping needed, and hand holding the piece for hand sanding wasn’t cumbersome at all, and best of all I was able to sit down while doing it. And the boo boo’s on the underside all sanded out with p800 and p1200 satisfactorily. Next step is to sand the bottoms of the feet to remove the saw marks. Idealy they will not only be flat and smooth, but also in the same plane. The best way to do this is with the piece mounted on the lathe and using a sanding board. Commonly I would use a Longworth chuck (or Cole jaws), but as you can see the Longworth buttons barely touch the piece and would never hold. Wtnhighlander had a good suggestion earlier for something that one might call a “sandwich chuck”. But this Longworth chuck also has doughnut rings that attach to the base, and the largest of these was a just right fit. A cushy mat for safe keeping Fold the mat’s corners over and then place the doughnut ring. Center as best I can and snug it down Then mount on the lathe and set up the sanding board as I did before. Now please know that this work hold is quite tenuous and as such is not good enough for any motorized turning on the lathe; I’ll be rotating the lathe by hand. (Just because a machine has a motor does not mean that you have to turn that motor on to make effective use of that machine). After a little work the feet are smooth. A wipe down with MS to give the bottom an over all inspection. At the risk of premature chicken counting and angering the wood spirit, I went ahead and put on my brand while it’s already nicely mounted (but not wanting to anger the Fire Chief I decided to wait until the MS evaporated). First step is to line up the brand on the foot’s center. Here I have the branding head unattached to the handle so I can position it on the foot. I use the box rest, which is like a small table, as my reference surface. Re-attached to the handle, the brand is heated with a propane torch. I can then lay the flat side of the head on the table and advance it to the wood surface. I have a heavy glove on my left hand so I can better guide the brand. There is a knack to this. You want the brand to land where you intend and do so flat on the wood surface. It needs to be there long enough to clearly make the mark and not so long as to make a hole. Good burn. Back to the sanding board setup to clean up the singeing around the hallmark. Relieved the sharp edges with some p1200 and it’s really done. I will probably give it a once over with p1200 to freshen the surface prior to applying the finish and that will wait for the rest of the project. Now to turn the block of walnut it’s sitting on into the basin that sits on top.
    • You also have to realize that it isn't Grizzly delivering the tool it will be a trucking company.
    • It’s delivery service, not setup/install service.  Make sure the truck will have a liftgate, otherwise you’ll be real upset when the driver moves the jointer to the edge of the tailgate and says, “Ok, your turn.” Call a couple friends and offer them pizza/beer/whatever, rent a pallet jack or dolly and don’t worry about what the driver will want to do. 
    • yeah i have some ideas of what i migth able to do. but on grizzly's website under their delivery policy it says they drop it on the curb of residences
    • yeah problem with that is getting the machine off the truck once i get home. learned that after woodcraft loaded my truck with my table saw, got home and was like now what. i mean i eventually got it off but it was sketch as hell and dont want to do that again
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