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    • I put glue on the small holes too.  I feel like it's a more permanent fix than just compressing the sheetrock core.  The gypsum absorbs the glue, and it makes the area a hard place, instead of a crumbling one in disguise.  On the walls I'm doing now, there were a bunch of little holes from tiny nails, not even in studs, holding fancy little plates on display.  On most of those, where there was not also a little flap of paper, the glue was all that was needed. The big Bosch ROS has been a lifesaver.  I've had to sand the whole walls in every room, but it's gone pretty fast with this sander.  I think I bought it for $299 a few years ago.  I was going to get another one, in case this one quit, but when I checked the price on Amazon, it's now up to $757.  I expect this one will last just fine.
    • Ahh my bad! Thanks for the clarification!
    • Curbless and handicapped require space
    • LOL what exactly do you do in there that you are going with a 16 x 16 bathroom ... wait I don't want to know 
    • Ross, The paint I used is a Benjamin Moore product.  At first I was going to pore fill all the existing oak cabinets but after talking with the guys at the Benjamin Moore store they thought I might get away with out the pore fill.   I did a sample test on one of the old doors following their suggested routine - I washed them with a solution of simple green and water, they recommend not using TSP, rinsed the surface twice just to make sure there wasn't any remaining soap.  Then I scuff sanded the surface with 150 grit to dull the surface, primed it, lightly sanding that with 220 then two coats of paint.  After doing the test I decided to skip the pore fill.  Just looking at the cabinets you can't see the gain of the Oak but with the light just right and looking from the side you can pick it up, but who looks at it that way after it's done other then maybe you.  I was going to brush the cabinets and spray the doors out in the shop.  But the B.M. guys recommended a real short nap velour mohair roller instead of the brush.  I was so pleased with how this worked out that I ended up doing the doors the same way, which in the end was probably faster because I was able to lay them out closer together in the shop instead of spread out more to spray, so I was able to do them in two batches instead of three maybe four ( I had 24 doors and 5 drawers in all to do).  It still was kind of a slow process because the paint requires a minimum of 6 hours before re-coating. Even though the cabinets are Oak, I used Maple for the new stuff and like I said unless you look any a real steep angle you can't tell that part is Oak and part Maple.  Even though I probably didn't need to prime the cabinets because the had the original finish, I did because I wanted to make sure there wasn't any difference in appearance between the old cabinets and new doors.  I wanted the same process on both parts. This is the two products that I used.
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