Introduce Yourself

Tell your fellow forum members who you are, where you hail from, and what type of woodworking you like to do.


1083 topics in this forum

  1. New to forum

    • 8 replies
    • 951 views
    • 2 replies
    • 1.2k views
    • 7 replies
    • 549 views
    • 3 replies
    • 502 views
  2. Hello

    • 6 replies
    • 619 views
    • 7 replies
    • 1.2k views
    • 10 replies
    • 1k views
    • 9 replies
    • 722 views
    • 5 replies
    • 783 views
    • 13 replies
    • 1.1k views
    • 7 replies
    • 880 views
    • 16 replies
    • 2k views
  3. Hello from NC

    • 10 replies
    • 691 views
  4. Chicagoan Here

    • 5 replies
    • 603 views
  5. Hello from Denver, NC!

    • 8 replies
    • 847 views
    • 8 replies
    • 881 views
  6. Hello from Texas

    • 12 replies
    • 978 views
    • 9 replies
    • 825 views
  7. Hi from Australia

    • 6 replies
    • 877 views
    • 7 replies
    • 722 views
  8. new to group

    • 7 replies
    • 779 views
    • 9 replies
    • 753 views
    • 5 replies
    • 584 views
  9. Hello from Minnesota!

    • 18 replies
    • 978 views
    • 1 reply
    • 490 views




  • Topics

  • Posts

    • OK, I'll say it before anyone else does . . . Watch Christian Becksvoort.  Dados for dividers and dovetails for tops and bottoms is a tried and true construction method.  If you're not into the dovetails, rabbets, dowels or hidden mechanical fasteners can work. You can also make your feet into posts and frame them in using mortise and tenons for the joinery.  This dresser is pretty stout and has been moved twice to new homes.  Even with the drawers out two guys and a dolly are preferred to lugging this beast.  No failures.
    • Not exactly a real "night" theme, is it. Tge clean theme waa actually less glaring!
    • When I route a profile on a rounded edge I make up a throw-away fence with a matching profile to keep the material well controlled and give me the smoothest cut I can get.  This one has a concave curve and a couple of stop blocks since the hand grip profile is a stopped cut.  Yours would just be a pie-slice negative for as much of a circle as you see fit to offer control.   The fence will assure that you can only move away from the bit.  This makes it easy to start and stop doping the profile in sections that slightly overlap.  Another option is a circle jig either riding the table top or supporting it for the router table.  This one supports the work and uses a center pin to guide the material. I would prefer this for a large chamfer more than a trammel type circle jig.  
    • Hello, I'm planning on making a larger dresser, 70" long, 18" deep, and 35" high. When taking the legs out of the conversation I'm basically making a box, 30" high. I'm using red oak that has been milled down to about 3/4" thick. I'm not confident using my normal dowel joinery for the top, bottom, and sides; thing thing will weigh a ton. Dados and rabbets wouldn't seem strong enough so I'm sort of at a loss on what to do. I've not made anything this big before using red oak. Any ideas?
    • Nut, that works well with straight cuts, but this case is a round table top.
  • Popular Contributors