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tonywill

Finish for Cypress?

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I made a couple of Adirondack chairs out of cypress. I didn't apply any finish to them. After a couple of months of use they've developed checks and cracks.

Two years ago I made the same chairs out of cedar. They've held up well with no splits.

Was it a mistake to use cypress? How can I save them? What finish should I use?

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Was it a mistake to use cypress? How can I save them? What finish should I use?

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I made a couple of Adirondack chairs our of Cypress and I used the "Desert Finish" Mark used for a exterior door. It was naptha, spar and BLO if I remember. They have lived outside for almost a year now and seem to be doing well. A little faded but not bad.

-Gary

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I am a huge fan of Sikkens. I use Cetol 1 as a primer and Cetol 23 as a second and may be a third coat.

I built some gates out of cypress and did not have any problems. Sorry to hear about your checks ...

Shannon has built some projects out of Cypress ... I think ... and if I am not mistaken he never finished them and they aged gracefully

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I've had GREAT results finishing Cypress with PENOFIN. I built some large exterior doors for the basement of my shop with Cytress ... slathered on two coats of PENOFIN ... and they still look great 5 years later. Now that you mention it, I think I'll give 'em another coat or two just because I have it on hand.

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I went with two coats of Cetol SRD. Time will tell.

Thanks for the advice!

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