JeffT

Flip top tool cart

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I am re-laying out my garage shop (again), and am interested in plans for a mobile tool cart with a flip top, I want to have a belt/disk sander on one side, and a small planner on the other. The design part I'm curious about is how to make the top easy to flip, but keep it stable when I'm using one of the tools. Any advice would be much appreciated.

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I made a flip top cart for my thickness planer.

It uses swing out eye bolts in each corner as pivot locks,

I didn't work from plans, but I did make step by step photos during the build.

Perhaps you might find the pictures helpful.

Click here for the web page.

P1010187.JPG

P1010217.JPG

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I did one for my miter saw with the other side an open work top. The pivoting box is offset to keep the deck of the saw or the worktop flush to the work surface next to the stand. I documented it on a blog posting long ago here. In my case, the locks are just cotterless pins inserted into a hole on both sides. For the pivot point, I also just used a nut and bolt, but I also bought teflon sleeves; you can get those in the drawers under the bags of bolts at Borg or Lowes. It makes the rotation smoother and I thought eventually the bolt would wear away my pivot hole. Likely over-thought that part.

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I don't recall the size of the bolt... take a look at the size of the hole drilled and compare it to the 1.5" thickness of the top, that should give you an idea. I think the bolts were 3 or 4 inches long.

If you like, I could take a wrench to it tomorrow and measure the diameter of the bolt, but it's really not critical.

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Wood Magazine has a 2 tool version in their Basic Built series. It was published in 2008, I believe. I'm not saying it's better, but if you have a copy of that issue, you can get an approximate cut list and parts list.

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I just checked... the lag bolts are 1/2" diameter.

Thanks, I appreciate you taking time to measure the size.

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I made one exactly like Alan except I used a 1" dowel for the pivot. The base for the tools (a ridgid lunchbox planer and a ridgid OSS) is a sandwich of 3/4" ply as the buns and 3/4" hardwood frame 2 1/2" wide all around. I anchored with eye bolts and drilled through before inserting and pinning the dowel with a 1 3/4" screw.

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