Cutting Curves in Traditional Japanese Woodwork


Tony Wilkins
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Thinking about making a pair of the short traditional saw beams that Toshio Odate mentions in his book. I have a question about the design. I noticed that he cut a couple of curves in the bases on the ones he shows. How would this have been done in traditional Japanese woodworking?

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Thanks fransikaner. Follow on question. If the parts for this thing range around 8/4 lumber, will my little 210mm Ryoba be beefy enough to cut it? If not, do I need a 270/300mm ryoba or something different?

I have the same 210mm Ryoba as you and have no issues cuttng joinery in 8/4 stock. If you're planning on ripping lumber with that saw, you might want something more agressive. I tend to rip most of my lumber with either a western style rip saw or with a table saw or band saw.

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Here's how I cut the Irisumi corners using Japanese saws, chisels and rasps (esp. Iwasaki carving files).

Step 1 - Layout the pattern.

Step 2 - Make a diagonal cut to remove the most wood.

Step 3 - Make the notch cuts to define the lobes.

Step 4 - Round-over the lobes with chisels and/or rasps.

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post-1170-0-09259900-1337684723_thumb.jp

post-1170-0-43108900-1337684804_thumb.jp

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Thanks all. Don't know how I missed some of these responses but just noticed them.

HoboMonk: very useful and definitely something I can do.

Now I just need to decide if I want to do the traditional Japanese saw horses, traditional english saw benches, or something different. With a severely bad back bending over is a challenge.

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