Spar

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Posted · Report post

Hi guys,

Just finished a trestle picnic table along with trestle benches. I didn't stain the bottom of the table, benches I did though, not sure of my reasoning there. But anyhow, when I go to spar with the 20/80 min/spar, do I do the bottom also? Does this need protection as much?

Thanks,

D

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Posted · Report post

Yes, you need to put a seal coat on both sides unless you like a twisted, curly look.

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Posted · Report post

Hi guys,

Just finished a trestle picnic table along with trestle benches. I didn't stain the bottom of the table, benches I did though, not sure of my reasoning there. But anyhow, when I go to spar with the 20/80 min/spar, do I do the bottom also? Does this need protection as much?

Thanks,

D

For outdoor uses, finish all sides.

Are you using spar urethane or spar varnish?

Blessings.

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Posted · Report post

Hi guys, thanks for your input, it was spar urethane btw, and I did the whole bit. Looks great considering it's pine lol, but in the long run I figure this saves me money.

I have to take the pine comment back. It was enjoyable to work with this time considering I prepped it all right and took no shortcuts. The end result, time consuming as it was, indeed was a pleasure to both work on and look at. Now I have to figure out how to put it back in my yard. Did this in a small workshop lol.

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This is the end result. Bit rushed, taking up too much space, which is why I asked the seemingly dumb question I did. I ended up finishing the trestles and all else, at the expense of my sciatica lol. Man,

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Posted · Report post

there should be a pic. wth man

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Note: The term "spar" refers to wooden boat parts, such as the mast and topside. It is NOT a particular type of finish.

So called, "Spar Urethane" is a consumer-grade polyurethane containing exterior varnish. It is not very durable.

Real Spar Varnish is usually a tung oil/phenolic resin varnish with UV inhibitors that is specially formulated for exterior wood applications. It is typically a "Long Oil" formulation that remains more flexible when it dries. It if far more durable than the cheaper consumer-grade knock-offs.

A good traditional Spar Varnish is available as a house brand at Ace Hardware stores. It is a real tung oil/phenolic resin varnish that performs well and is less costly than the high priced imports, such as Epifanes.

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Posted · Report post

Yeah. I know that. USN Constitution was in my past. ;) Made my own mix with spar, real tung oil, not metal pressed, and minera spirits.

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Posted · Report post

I'm sorry HoboMonk, for this late response, but thank you for the information.

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