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Mike M

Laminated Turnings - Glue Line Problem

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I've made a few bowls with laminated blanks and noticed a problem with the glue lines. I sanded the bowls to 600 grit and finished with either oil and wax or wiping varnish. The glue joints were smooth at first. After a couple of days I noticed that I could feel the transitions on the joints.

The wood has been in the house for several months so it is stable. The glue is TB-2 and was allowed to dry at least 24 hours in every case. The woods were various combinations of soft maple, cherry, hard curly maple and peruvian walnut.

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im guessing its just because its colder outside and the wood has shrunk and since the wood is so smooth you can feel the seperations more easily. the wood shrinks but the glue does not.

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Our laminated turner expert in my woodturner's club recommends that after glue up, you rough turn the item then set it on a shelf for several months before returning back to it to finish turning it. That will allow the glue lines to stabilize.

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