Downdraft sanding table/workbench


KeithJuly

Recommended Posts

The need to control sanding dust has been evident in my shop for some time. Like most small shops, work space is at a premium and a downdraft sanding table has a substantial foot print. I looked at several of the tables available and decided the table top models were too small for the type of woodworking that I do. The next obstacle would be where to store it when not in use. With these requirements in mind I went looking for a sanding table to fit my needs.

About a year ago I joined a woodworking forum called WoodNet. www.forums.woodnet.net My first post was on “Why clean your shop” and one of the members (Michael Curtis of South Carolina ) posted several pictures of his downdraft sanding table. Those pictures were the inspiration for my shop built table. Thanks Michael. http://bit.ly/9hP0KW The pictures of his table are on page four.

My new table is a self contained sanding table and workbench. It solves the issue of where to keep the sanding table when not in use. A solid workbench that measures 28″ x 88″ x 34 1/4″ high. The frame is made of 2″ x 8″ pine and is supported by 3 1/2″ X 4″ laminated maple legs. The top is two pieces of 3/4″ fir plywood laminated and banded with hard maple. At a later date, I will be adding that one thing that every workbench needs… a vise.

I used a Jet dust collector model dc-650. After removing the two bags and hose, I unbolted the base and cut 6″ off the tube that is attached to the motor. Using the flange that held the top bag, I screwed the dust collector to the bottom of the sanding table. A thick bead of caulk was applied around the flange and to the intake tube, where it penetrated the bottom of the table.

After installing the lower bag and connecting power, it was obvious the bag was too small and restricting the air flow.

I ordered a custom bag from American Fabric Filter co.

www.americanfrabricfilter.com

The $140.00 bag fits like a glove and with nearly three times the volume as the original bag, it really does the job. A huge zipper across the bottom will make this bag a breeze to empty.

dd12-1.jpg

dd15-1.jpg

dd14-1.jpg

dd9-1.jpg

dd7-1-1.jpg

A blast gate was added to reduce the area when sanding smaller parts.

A 1/2″ x 1/2″ hardwood strip was added around the inside edge to support the pegboard.

dd6-1.jpg

DSC04913-1.jpg

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keith,

That looks really nice! I would like to build a downdraft table for my shop too. I really like your idea of the hinged worktop to make it usable space when not sanding. I thought about making mine about half the size of yours and making a removable top that slides out from the front when I need to use the draft table. I was just going to make a dust port to plug my collector hose on it.

You may already be doing this, but I have found that attaching the shop vac to the sander sucks up most the the sanding dust anyway. That is how I am going about it for now until I can get a draft table built.

Thanks for sharing your project and happy sanding/breathing! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Brett,

My original plan was to connect the table to my dust collection system and I did my first test using a 4" hose but I couldn't find a good way to run the hose. After tripping over the hose several times, I started looking for something different.

I think that your idea to have a sliding top would work. I wish I would have thought of that for my bench. Using your idea I could double the size of the work top and used the extra space to store parts waiting to be sanded.

I may have to do a post showing modifications.:)

Thanks for commenting.

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Brett,

My original plan was to connect the table to my dust collection system and I did my first test using a 4" hose but I couldn't find a good way to run the hose. After tripping over the hose several times, I started looking for something different.

I think that your idea to have a sliding top would work. I wish I would have thought of that for my bench. Using your idea I could double the size of the work top and used the extra space to store parts waiting to be sanded.

I may have to do a post showing modifications.:)

Thanks for commenting.

Keith

Keith,

Since you got me thinking about a sanding table, I came up with another idea that might work for mine.

I have some work surfaces that are attached right to the framing of the shop and there are legs that are on the front, going to the floor for support. I did it this way because the concrete is sooooo rough and uneven. I have open space under the surfaces that I thought that I could build shelving attached to the legs and the framing too.

I was thinking that I could actually make a sliding sanding table (approx 2'x4') that is attached under the work surface and I can pull it out and have some drop down legs to support it while in use. I can use the work surface behind the pulled out sanding table to stage the pieces. This is what I got from your idea. When I am done, I fold the legs under and push the table under the fixed table and I'm done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 60 Guests (See full list)

    • There are no registered users currently online
  • Forum Statistics

    31.2k
    Total Topics
    422.1k
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    23,780
    Total Members
    3,644
    Most Online
    sadep44498
    Newest Member
    sadep44498
    Joined