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Green Head

Grizzly G5959z, Any Thoughts

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I have the oppurtunity to purchase a Grizzly g5959z table saw. It is a left-tilting 5 HP 12 inch saw. I don't really know anything about it other than that.

Just wondering if anybody has any experience with this saw? It's much bigger than any saw I've used before, just starting to get all my tools together.

It does have a 1'' arbor, but you can buy a 5/8'' adapter. So, I guess that means I would be able to use all my 10'' blades and dado stacks on it.

I'm not sure if it has a riving knife or if you can get one for it. May just have to do a splitter like the one in Marks recent video.

Just wanting any input you might have on this saw, good or bad.

Thanks

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Do you have the electrical requirement to run saw and dust collector at same time?

Yeah I'm set up for the saw. Just don't know if it's worth picking up, and for what price?

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Iv'e never used one or seen one in person, but I'm remember when they were current. I've read posts from a couple of happy owners, and don't recall any complaints. It's got a traditional splitter, no riving knife. It's big. That's about all I know about it. How much is it?

Keep us posted!

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Iv'e never used one or seen one in person, but I'm remember when they were current. I've read posts from a couple of happy owners, and don't recall any complaints. It's got a traditional splitter, no riving knife. It's big. That's about all I know about it. How much is it?

Keep us posted!

Thanks for the info. It's $700.

No idea how old it is. Does that sound like a good price? It appears to be in good shape. Starts and runs fine as far as I can tell.

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Thanks for the info. It's $700.

No idea how old it is. Does that sound like a good price? It appears to be in good shape. Starts and runs fine as far as I can tell.

$700 would be a fair price of a G1023 in good condition....the G5959Z is bigger and heavier duty. If it's in good shape and runs well, I'd think $700 is a good price if the saw suits your needs.

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