Clear corrugated roof?


Bombarde16

Recommended Posts

Moving to a new house in three weeks and already drafting plans for (drumroll, please) a standalone workshop in the backyard.

Toying with different ideas and while killing time meandering aimlessly doing important research in the home center, I stumbled across the clear, corrugated roofing panels. Wondered if I could do the roof with these, creating a massive skylight and perhaps getting some sort of greenhouse, solar heating. This is in northern Illinois, so we get everything from subzero mountains of snow to blistering summers.

The default is wood trusses, plywood and shingles yadayada. But I wondered if these panels were even viable or desirable for a workshop.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Rob,

I used the translucent fiberglass panels on a lean to on the back of my shop for storage. It was an oven in the summer and fairly warm on sunny winter days. I would go with the conventional roof and consider real sky lights or the tubes that transmit light. Congratulations on the new digs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't used these, but I would be concerned about

  • excessive noise when it rains (but maybe you'd be wearing hearing protection anyway)
  • too hot in the summer, when the sun is more vertical
  • not so hot in the winter, when the sun is more horizontal

I'd put big windows or maybe translucent fiberglass panels on the south side of the structure, and plant some deciduous trees there. In the summer the sun is more vertical and the trees would provide shade; in the winter the lower sun would come through the windows, and the bare trees would not block it much.

In one of the previous TWW forums (maybe the first one?) there was a post by a guy who made solar heating panels. I think it may have been this guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to agree, insulating is the mother of necessity when it comes to comfort. I also second the vote for skylights, my inlaws put in a couple of the tube style skylights a few years ago and they sure are nice letting in lots of light and helps keep the electric bill down (small amount but still helps) as well since the lights aren't on very often. Congrats on a new home but most importantly the shop :D

Nate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moving to a new house in three weeks and already drafting plans for (drumroll, please) a standalone workshop in the backyard.

Toying with different ideas and while killing time meandering aimlessly doing important research in the home center, I stumbled across the clear, corrugated roofing panels. Wondered if I could do the roof with these, creating a massive skylight and perhaps getting some sort of greenhouse, solar heating. This is in northern Illinois, so we get everything from subzero mountains of snow to blistering summers.

The default is wood trusses, plywood and shingles yadayada. But I wondered if these panels were even viable or desirable for a workshop.

Rob,

Be careful with the Home Center translucent panels. They are not very UV stable. Over time (4 to 8 years) they will become brittle & crack. Snow loads will greatly accelerate their failure.

If you want translucent panels to allow light in (they are a great idea) they should be combined with metal roof panels for strenght. Never put 2 translucent panels immediately adjacent to each other. Also make sure the are fiberglass reinforced for strength.

If your looking to do a metal roof with light transmitting panels (their technical name) you should go with a reputable metal roof manufacturer such as MBCI, Matassa or PAC-Clad. They'll all provide quality metal roof panels, light transmitting panels & accessories, thought MBCI will likely be cheapest.

If you'd like any help with the design, please let me know. I'm a commercial roof project manager by day, and I've got tons of experience with all types of Roofing. I'm happy to help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rob,

Be careful with the Home Center translucent panels. They are not very UV stable. Over time (4 to 8 years) they will become brittle & crack. Snow loads will greatly accelerate their failure.

If you want translucent panels to allow light in (they are a great idea) they should be combined with metal roof panels for strenght. Never put 2 translucent panels immediately adjacent to each other. Also make sure the are fiberglass reinforced for strength.

If your looking to do a metal roof with light transmitting panels (their technical name) you should go with a reputable metal roof manufacturer such as MBCI, Matassa or PAC-Clad. They'll all provide quality metal roof panels, light transmitting panels & accessories, thought MBCI will likely be cheapest.

If you'd like any help with the design, please let me know. I'm a commercial roof project manager by day, and I've got tons of experience with all types of Roofing. I'm happy to help.

Thats the great thing about here, always someone lending a helping hand-that and you can always say "I know a guy---"

Nate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rob, the biggest problem with those that I see is heat-loss, MASSIVE heat loss. There is VERY little R-Value to them. As stated, go with a traditional roof, and use skylights or Solar Tubes if you want to take advantage of sunlight. But, remember to take into consideration solar gain, which is a plus in the winter and negative in the summer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.