Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Dado Insert plate

10 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

So, i finally picked up the Freud Dado King 8" dado set from lee valley.

Now i need to decide on an insert plate for my table saw. I tried to make one previously and it didn't work out, along with the main screw that holds it in place there's also a clip that holds the rear that is difficult to implement. The one i had previously made ended up being wobbly and not a safe/ideal situation.

So i've got two options for my table saw. A standard and a zero clearance. Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions? My concern with getting the zero clearance is that when i raise the blade through to allow for passage of the blade at one width then need to do it again at another would that cause chipout or damage the insert? (I could of course just use all chippers/shims and make it the maximum width, but not sure if that's worth doing either (as normally i'll be doing 3/4 at most)

Would it be better to go with just the standard?

Here's both plates:

post-242-0-44353100-1300890144_thumb.png post-242-0-78951700-1300890150_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Personally I use a zero clearance insert all the time no matter whether it is for a standard blade or dado blade. But then again, I make all my inserts for my saw so it is not a big deal for me to have a different insert for different sized dado cuts.

However with that said, I can't really think of a situation where I was making a dado cut and "needed" a zero clearance insert. Zero clearance inserts do a couple of things, reduce chipout on the edges of the cut and keep small pieces from falling down into the saw. With a dado cut, this last feature is not necessary because you won't make a through cut.

I would be inclined to get the zero clearance and just cut through with the dado size you're making. Whenever you get to the larger size, cut through and don't worry about it. You'll be able to cut the smaller sizes in the larger hole and it won't affect anything later.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks.

My concern though is after making the initial cut when I go to use a larger size stack that it may cause chipout or ruin the plate (as not as much for it to bite into etc). Just wanted to make sure that won't happen.

Personally I use a zero clearance insert all the time no matter whether it is for a standard blade or dado blade. But then again, I make all my inserts for my saw so it is not a big deal for me to have a different insert for different sized dado cuts.

However with that said, I can't really think of a situation where I was making a dado cut and "needed" a zero clearance insert. Zero clearance inserts do a couple of things, reduce chipout on the edges of the cut and keep small pieces from falling down into the saw. With a dado cut, this last feature is not necessary because you won't make a through cut.

I would be inclined to get the zero clearance and just cut through with the dado size you're making. Whenever you get to the larger size, cut through and don't worry about it. You'll be able to cut the smaller sizes in the larger hole and it won't affect anything later.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks.

My concern though is after making the initial cut when I go to use a larger size stack that it may cause chipout or ruin the plate (as not as much for it to bite into etc). Just wanted to make sure that won't happen.

You will get chip out with those one size fits all dado throat plates. Your best bet is to make your own blank inserts and cut a new one every time you run across a dado size that you already don't have. Mark on the back of the insert the dado size and start building your collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yeah unfortunately as I said i made one and it didn't work out. It was a snug fit but as there was nothing holding it in the rear it wobbled. (there is just the one screw holding it in the front) The ones from the manufacture have kind of a clip.lip thing that inserts under the top of the saw to keep it in place.

You will get chip out with those one size fits all dado throat plates. Your best bet is to make your own blank inserts and cut a new one every time you run across a dado size that you already don't have. Mark on the back of the insert the dado size and start building your collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Yeah unfortunately as I said i made one and it didn't work out. It was a snug fit but as there was nothing holding it in the rear it wobbled. (there is just the one screw holding it in the front) The ones from the manufacture have kind of a clip.lip thing that inserts under the top of the saw to keep it in place.

You could very easily add a front clip to the homemade ZCI's you make. A couple of things you could use for the clips would be one of those mirror mounting clips you can find at the hardware store. Another possible way would be to glue a piece of popcycle stick to the front of the underside of the ZCI. Either of those two methods would be easy and cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I've developed an insert for the Emerson-built Craftsman contractor saws. It has a rear clip and front screw. I'm using polycarbonate and because the insert is so thin (3/16"), I use a center rib for reinforcement. I notch the rib to fit under the table top in place of the clip.

CM-113-ZCI-3-20-11.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Nice!

What made you go that route instead of wood or HDF, etc?

I've developed an insert for the Emerson-built Craftsman contractor saws. It has a rear clip and front screw. I'm using polycarbonate and because the insert is so thin (3/16"), I use a center rib for reinforcement. I notch the rib to fit under the table top in place of the clip.

CM-113-ZCI-3-20-11.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Renzo, what type of saw do you own? A photo of the blade opening would help in advising on how to stabilize the insert. As you can see, I use 1/2" Baltic Birch for the insert. I used a pattern bit to the main pattern off the one that came with the TS. I don't use the actual TS insert because it has slots and the nub to keep it from coming up in the back. Once you have a pattern made, it's easy to make many of these. I use small wood screws as levelers and tap a 3/4" brad nail in the back that hooks under the TS top that keep it from coming up in the back.

post-8-0-00253000-1301152649_thumb.jpg

post-8-0-35425500-1301152663_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Thanks, Vic.

I have a General 50-220 Hybrid saw.

Using a brad nail to act as a stabilizer is the best idea i've heard yet. I've already ordered the zero clearance dado insert, but as soon as I need to go a different width, i'll definitely try what you suggest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Wow 15000+ members
      By Brendon_t · Posted
      that'll keep him busy for about 36 seconds. .
    • Home made tools
      By minorhero · Posted
      One of the biggest problems with a lot of the home made tools I have seen is the extreme difficulty of setting up cuts. Many of them you can setup simply for one cut and then leave it there. But lets say you had some wood 1" thick you wanted to cut on your table saw. This is a matter of seconds to setup on a regular store bought saw. But if you try to do it on a home made saw where its not already setup you might need to loosen screws, move tops around, resquare a home made fence, etc etc. Then you need to cut a piece of wood 1.5 inches thick and few inches wider. Now you need to do it all again. Then you realize, you need to cut some more wood at the original size, now you have to put it all back again... and it has to be exact because this is very much a hobby where a millimeter can make a big difference. Bottom line is that while its possible to make a home made tool these are more curiosities in the hobby then practical machines. Then there is the issue of calibration. Like I said a millimeter can make a big difference. If your homemade tool relies on say wood as a construction material, and the wood you use expands, contracts, or warps with the changing seasons in any place that needs to remain dead flat.. well  now all your cuts are off. And you might not even know it till you go to put things together and nothing quite fits right. And then there is issue of safety. Some tools really do need a motor that is attached by very strong bolts to a metal frame so that if something terrible happens (say someone knocks it over while in use, or something heavy falls into the belt and gets torqued around rapidly) your homemade tool does not literally kill or maim you or someone else. Obviously not all homemade tools would be in this category, but some I have seen frankly give me the heebie-jeebies with what-ifs. So as others have said, just buy used or new tools. You will be much happier in both the short and long run. That said, as someone who is constantly thinking first second and last about cost as a barrier of entry into this hobby my strong advice is not to buy a whole shop. But just the barest minimum of tools needed to get started. What is your first project? What tools do you need to complete it? Can you do it with less? Would powered hand tools work as well as the floor tools? Do you need a bandsaw, or would a jig saw be just as good? Do you need a table saw right away, or would a circular saw with a straight edge do for now? Etc etc.
    • Wow 15000+ members
      By Vyrolan · Posted
      Except when Giada is on, right?
    • Home made tools
      By weithman5 · Posted
      there are things to make, (router table, sled, lifts and the like) and there are things to buy. In my mind things that can take off a finger you should probably buy unless you have already had some experience with them and with the engineering involved.
    • Mahogany Spear Gun
      By Brendon_t · Posted
      tthat action is called ballasting. Once done,  I'll load it withe a spear and bands any any other hardware and take it into the water.  Using 1/2oz fishing weights I'll add weight until two things happen. 1) the gun begins to very slowly sink and 2) move the weight front to back until it balances in hand. Once the weight and location are known, I'll drill out a trough with a first forstner bit, melt down the needed weight of lead in my crucible then pour it into the cavity. Epoxy will take up any more space and a mahogany cover should make it "dissapear" My brothers 62" FEQ teak gun took about 11 oz if I  remember correctly. 
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting