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Dado Insert plate


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#1 Renzo

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 06:23 AM

So, i finally picked up the Freud Dado King 8" dado set from lee valley.

Now i need to decide on an insert plate for my table saw. I tried to make one previously and it didn't work out, along with the main screw that holds it in place there's also a clip that holds the rear that is difficult to implement. The one i had previously made ended up being wobbly and not a safe/ideal situation.

So i've got two options for my table saw. A standard and a zero clearance. Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions? My concern with getting the zero clearance is that when i raise the blade through to allow for passage of the blade at one width then need to do it again at another would that cause chipout or damage the insert? (I could of course just use all chippers/shims and make it the maximum width, but not sure if that's worth doing either (as normally i'll be doing 3/4 at most)

Would it be better to go with just the standard?

Here's both plates:

Screen shot 2011-03-23 at 10.17.01 AM.png Screen shot 2011-03-23 at 10.17.09 AM.png

#2 TimV

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 11:10 AM

Personally I use a zero clearance insert all the time no matter whether it is for a standard blade or dado blade. But then again, I make all my inserts for my saw so it is not a big deal for me to have a different insert for different sized dado cuts.

However with that said, I can't really think of a situation where I was making a dado cut and "needed" a zero clearance insert. Zero clearance inserts do a couple of things, reduce chipout on the edges of the cut and keep small pieces from falling down into the saw. With a dado cut, this last feature is not necessary because you won't make a through cut.

I would be inclined to get the zero clearance and just cut through with the dado size you're making. Whenever you get to the larger size, cut through and don't worry about it. You'll be able to cut the smaller sizes in the larger hole and it won't affect anything later.

Tim

#3 Renzo

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 11:15 AM

Thanks.

My concern though is after making the initial cut when I go to use a larger size stack that it may cause chipout or ruin the plate (as not as much for it to bite into etc). Just wanted to make sure that won't happen.

Personally I use a zero clearance insert all the time no matter whether it is for a standard blade or dado blade. But then again, I make all my inserts for my saw so it is not a big deal for me to have a different insert for different sized dado cuts.

However with that said, I can't really think of a situation where I was making a dado cut and "needed" a zero clearance insert. Zero clearance inserts do a couple of things, reduce chipout on the edges of the cut and keep small pieces from falling down into the saw. With a dado cut, this last feature is not necessary because you won't make a through cut.

I would be inclined to get the zero clearance and just cut through with the dado size you're making. Whenever you get to the larger size, cut through and don't worry about it. You'll be able to cut the smaller sizes in the larger hole and it won't affect anything later.

Tim





#4 Dave's Not Here

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 03:12 PM

Thanks.

My concern though is after making the initial cut when I go to use a larger size stack that it may cause chipout or ruin the plate (as not as much for it to bite into etc). Just wanted to make sure that won't happen.


You will get chip out with those one size fits all dado throat plates. Your best bet is to make your own blank inserts and cut a new one every time you run across a dado size that you already don't have. Mark on the back of the insert the dado size and start building your collection.

#5 Renzo

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:07 AM

Yeah unfortunately as I said i made one and it didn't work out. It was a snug fit but as there was nothing holding it in the rear it wobbled. (there is just the one screw holding it in the front) The ones from the manufacture have kind of a clip.lip thing that inserts under the top of the saw to keep it in place.

You will get chip out with those one size fits all dado throat plates. Your best bet is to make your own blank inserts and cut a new one every time you run across a dado size that you already don't have. Mark on the back of the insert the dado size and start building your collection.





#6 Dave's Not Here

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 10:12 AM

Yeah unfortunately as I said i made one and it didn't work out. It was a snug fit but as there was nothing holding it in the rear it wobbled. (there is just the one screw holding it in the front) The ones from the manufacture have kind of a clip.lip thing that inserts under the top of the saw to keep it in place.


You could very easily add a front clip to the homemade ZCI's you make. A couple of things you could use for the clips would be one of those mirror mounting clips you can find at the hardware store. Another possible way would be to glue a piece of popcycle stick to the front of the underside of the ZCI. Either of those two methods would be easy and cheap.

#7 BorkBob

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 03:09 AM

I've developed an insert for the Emerson-built Craftsman contractor saws. It has a rear clip and front screw. I'm using polycarbonate and because the insert is so thin (3/16"), I use a center rib for reinforcement. I notch the rib to fit under the table top in place of the clip.

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#8 Renzo

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 04:32 AM

Nice!

What made you go that route instead of wood or HDF, etc?

I've developed an insert for the Emerson-built Craftsman contractor saws. It has a rear clip and front screw. I'm using polycarbonate and because the insert is so thin (3/16"), I use a center rib for reinforcement. I notch the rib to fit under the table top in place of the clip.

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#9 Vic

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 07:17 AM

Renzo, what type of saw do you own? A photo of the blade opening would help in advising on how to stabilize the insert. As you can see, I use 1/2" Baltic Birch for the insert. I used a pattern bit to the main pattern off the one that came with the TS. I don't use the actual TS insert because it has slots and the nub to keep it from coming up in the back. Once you have a pattern made, it's easy to make many of these. I use small wood screws as levelers and tap a 3/4" brad nail in the back that hooks under the TS top that keep it from coming up in the back.

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#10 Renzo

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 06:03 AM

Thanks, Vic.

I have a General 50-220 Hybrid saw.

Using a brad nail to act as a stabilizer is the best idea i've heard yet. I've already ordered the zero clearance dado insert, but as soon as I need to go a different width, i'll definitely try what you suggest.