Hello from Oz


AussieWorkshop
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Ah I missed your intro the first time around.

Welcome! I think you'll find this place is pretty hospitable. Kinda informative. Sometimes entertaining :)

Hmm, sawmill owner. Maybe it's asking too much, but I'd love it if you started a thread with pictures of your mill. Guarantee it will be the topic of the week. We don't get to see the insides of the mill too often.

One question, though... you said specializing is "Qld" Maple. Is that an Australian variety or a type of cut that we're not familiar with?

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Ah I missed your intro the first time around.

Welcome! I think you'll find this place is pretty hospitable. Kinda informative. Sometimes entertaining :)

Hmm, sawmill owner. Maybe it's asking too much, but I'd love it if you started a thread with pictures of your mill. Guarantee it will be the topic of the week. We don't get to see the insides of the mill too often.

One question, though... you said specializing is "Qld" Maple. Is that an Australian variety or a type of cut that we're not familiar with?

Hi Paul-Marcel,Qld Maple is a species that grows in Queensland.Will happily post photos of the mill,and what it can do.Thanks for showing an interest! Cheers Chris

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Chris & Paul,

Good to see another Aussie in here. I live in Heyfield, Gippsland, Victoria just across the road from the Gunns owned sawmill (Biggest hardwood mill in the southern hemisphere). Would be great to see some photos of your mill when you can. The Gunns mill here only has boring Vic Ash, stacks of it, seems to run 24hrs these days, loads and loads of timber sitting there drying for 15months then they wack it in the kiln to dry more before turning into beams and building material. Trucks drive in and out all day. I don't know where they get so many logs from, amazing the trees can grow fast enough to keep up the demand.

Here's a link to Google earth. You can just see my tiny house next to all those rows and rows of timber. Look at the scale of this map. ITS A HUGE AMOUNT OF TIMBER! If you zoom right out you can almost see it from space! Well not quite but hey, its what makes this town, without it the town would shut down. (My workshop is where the red baloon is, barley visible) :unsure:

My Tiny House in a town full of timber

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  • 2 years later...

Hey there my name is James I live in the south eastern suburbs of Melbourne back when I was in height school I used to love shop class and thought I would get back into it i have very little tools( a few small clamps a copping saw skew drivers and a hammer) I make things on the occasion but am buying a house at the moment and am saving for that before getting some more tools I enjoy the designing process quite a bit and if I can get them online ill post a few of my designs up maybe

so when ever I'm not sailing the seas (cos it's my job as a seamen) or playing my PC or ps3 I'm usually designing thinks to make

Hope to talk to you soon see ya

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  • 2 months later...
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  • 1 year later...

Hi all. John here from Adelaide. I have a 30 acre farm in the southern vine growing area of Adelaide.

 

Not every thing is Jarrah. My house is built from reclaimed Kauri, A WA hard wood similar to Jarrah. It is like trying to work cast iron sometimes. There is a ton (probably literally) laying about the place in slabs and boards waiting for some good ideas. It polishes up to a deep rich red colour. In fact our main living are, 7m x 13m has a floor made of 8" square 1" thick slices of the stuff, end grin up if you will. Will look fantastic once sanded and polished. Has not had anything done to ti since it was laid 30 years ago. Most of the cubboard tops are also slabs of Kauti as well. It will be incorporated into the new kitchen, eventually. The doors are also Kauri. In fact alsmot all of teh wood is from the reclaimed Kauri.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here are some of teh photos.

 

This is the floor. it is now 30 years old and in desperate need of refinishing

https://www.flickr.com/gp/jmbh/1r1p06

 

Here are the vice jaws. They have a coat of linseed oil.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/jmbh/4zCWH1

 

And here is a sample board (fresh from a thicknesser with blunt blades :(

https://www.flickr.com/gp/jmbh/761020

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Yes it does. It is like cast iron. We have two really dense hardwoods in Australia, Jarrah and Kauri. Kauri is now very hard to get but Jarrah is quite common but most of the fresh Jarrah is new growth which is lighter and not so dense. Recovered Jarrah is still relatively easy to come by. All our railway lines were laid down using Jarrah sleepers. It is also very common for garden beds but treated Pinus Radiata is as common as mud here now for outdoor construction timber.

 

This is recovered so it is old growth and extremely dense. Hard on tools but worth the effort. I can make large blocks by jointing and gluing and the joins all but disappear. The large vice jaw is 2 pieces glued.

 

The floor is end grain glued to the concrete with Agnews water putty with colouring powder added to match the wood. I think it would have been niced if teh floor pieces were more close fitting to be honest but I think once it is sanded and finished it will be really nice.

 

John

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