Get Some Wood In Your Life


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I ended up winning a 22" that looks great for $10.00 USD.

The blade looks nice and thick and it looks to have the matching cap iron.

I only worry about the cheeks being damaged by people "wiggling" the blade out because they are unaware that they need to smack the button.

I won't get mine for 4-5 days. Shipping via a slow boat.

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I'd get in on this if I wanted some frustration in my life.  Y'all have a blast, though.

Wife brought me this from a garage sale, guess she is paying more attention than I thought

I love wooden planes. Here some of the ones that I use.    

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Ok this is good. Chris, don't stress, glue and a screw or two will do you, the handle fell off my try plane, had it fixed in five mins. I should have my video ready on this soon guys. C, you did pick a beast, just go for a flat sole and a sharp blade, forget the rest for now, let's see what it can do :-). Chet, dont worry too much, look forward to the slow boat arriving.

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It Jacks just fine. I'll have to figure out how to reduce the cross grain toe end throat patch before I figure out if I can use this beast as a try/jointer. I am not fully resolved on mating chip breakers to irons and so this is one more rehab that I am getting some shavings between the two.

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Hey C, thanks for the Vid. You appear to have a log with a blade in it :-).

 

Loose handle - Clean out the dust and fith, apply gorilla glue/polyurethane adhesive and screw in place.

 

Mouth Infill - Quite common to re mouth a wooden plane so not totally unexpected. Again, I would clean off any loose filth and see if this would stick back in with some clamps expoy or gorilla glue.

 

Blade - At this time avoid grinding the rounded top, it's not hurting. On mating the cap iron to the blade I will post a tip within a vid I'm off to do, will be live in four hours or so. 

 

Sole - Scoring, and grooves are no problem, flat enough is what we are going for, will include this in the video.

 

Fingers crossed we can get Noah's plane working :-).

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Ok, so here we have two very rough videos that were done in a hurry!. Had to use one of the guys benches as my work area is going through some changes. What I learned from these vids, don't pull stupid faces (really freakin odd faces!) when honing :-) 

 

Jack Plane

 

http://youtu.be/pVDO--EA2BI

 

Trying Plane

 

http://youtu.be/OvxGWKXgwuo it only works really really nice at 10:00

 

Let the shave off begin :-)

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Ok, rules for a plane off, me and my big mouth :-).

 

Open to suggestions but thinking one or some of

 

Try Plane

 

Finest shaving

Creating a glue joint edge on two boards and gluing it up.

Thickest shaving

 

Jack Plane,

 

Speed thicknessing on a board of a given size

Thickest shaving

 

Special award already goes to C for awesome work so far. Just a thought C, if you want to help those checks near the mouth you could also add a screw or two to add some support along with the epoxy. Not super nice to look at but would certianly do a job.

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I have not made a priority of it yet. The blade is a bit wider than my finer stones and so I pulled a few shavings just with a sloppy secondary bevel off 600-800. I'll likely attack that and the chipbreaker after dinner.

Uhh, the chipbreaker lays tight on one side of the iron and rocks so the other side gaps by a mm. I haven't found the spot it is rocking on yet or figured quite how to settle this down. Should be a quick grind when I sort it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I attacked this plane again in my boredom. I replaced the throat patch initially out of some ash I split out of firewood. I decided to try inlaying something harder where a hammer had chewed up the top of the body. I shaped my filler piece with some planing and cut the recess with chisels and a Stanley knife. I used Massaranduba that I have around judging that it will hold up to hammers. (Yes Graham, I also commonly reach for an Estwing.) The old plane top was a bit dry rotted or flaky in spots and that left me with some torn fibers in the curves. I used epoxy and the black shows the poor fit I achieved. I chalk this up to a learning experience. It kept me busy for a day:-)post-9382-0-60464400-1391025682_thumb.jppost-9382-0-08020100-1391025696_thumb.jppost-9382-0-21266200-1391025713_thumb.jppost-9382-0-36145800-1391025724_thumb.jp

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  • 2 weeks later...

So I finally got my wood fore plane up and running. I had really bad vertigo for two weeks but now I'm on the mend and getting some more time in the shop.

 

This wasn't a big job, really. The handle was loose so first step I just epoxied it back in. I haven't added a screw for extra insurance yet—figured I'd see how the epoxy does by itself.

 

The sole was pretty out of flat in the front, so much so that it rocked a bit. I'm not sure it would have mattered on a plane intended for rough thickening but I decided to flatten it a bit. Was a piece of cake to run my Veritas LA Jack over it and true up the sole, although I didn't worry about it being perfect.

 

Lastly I sharpened and put a camber on the blade which took the most time. I still haven't gotten a hand grinder up and running (I now own two and have two different sized bushings on order from Amazon—hopefully I can make one work with my 3X grinding wheel) but I broke down and cambered it with P80 sandpaper on glass. I think I'm only down to 10" radius, rather than 8" which is what Chris Schwarz recommends for a fore plane. But it's working OK and I can camber some more once I get a grinder.

 

Blade before:

szAPyjALe6mfY1GvW80Pipau15jxfE.png

 

Blade after, with camber:

cDa6zSBaVBckdXbySbD9m2CZjlsQmL.png

 

Forgot to take a pic of sole before, here's after:

aA1jgb4OuGi3q9umCT2h2CL9xGZNqW.png

 

And taking some nice thick shavings!!!

BpdARgqtFJYAQwA8hahRySvbOUxsUS.png

 

Thanks again GS for the push to try these out. I'm still not sure if I'd get a used wooden plan for, say, a smoother, but for a foreplane it's a great option and much cheeper than what #5's seem to be going for now-a-days (I only paid $25 for this incl. shipping).

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Lastly I sharpened and put a camber on the blade which took the most time. I still haven't gotten a hand grinder up and running (I now own two and have two different sized bushings on order from Amazon—hopefully I can make one work with my 3X grinding wheel) but I broke down and cambered it with P80 sandpaper on glass. I think I'm only down to 10" radius, rather than 8" which is what Chris Schwarz recommends for a fore plane. But it's working OK and I can camber some more once I get a grinder.

 

If your newly rehabbed plane is working for you, don’t worry about redoing the camber. I initially put an 8” radius camber on my jack planes, and over time I’ve reduced the camber down to about a 10” radius. The bottom line is that you have a camber that allows you to hog off wood efficiently while leaving a surface that is not so scalloped that further flattening and smoothing is a pain in the tuckus. The exact radius is not critical for this task to be accomplished.

 

Nice job on the rehab, by the way! Your plane looks great.   ^_^

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