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gee-dub

Tablesaw Dovetail Jig Ver 1

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Great concept gee-dub! I'm going to work on a similar jig once I finish this project and a model of my next one. I really like the double ended indexing. 

I have found that if you plan on doing much TS dovetailing at all it's worth the investment in a blade ground to the 7 degree or whatever angle you like. With a little care in setting the blade height you can do almost 100% on the saw.

Thanks for posting this!

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Sides of the pins or tails? ;-)

Only if I don't get a good fit right off the saw.  Practice is making me better but, I do use a chisel to make an errant pin fit if things are too snug.

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Sorry I'm trying to understand how you get a smooth bottom. In your first images you have a shot of some in progress tails, I'm trying to understand how you move from that to a nice smooth surface.

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8 hours ago, Isaac Gaetz said:

Sorry I'm trying to understand how you get a smooth bottom. In your first images you have a shot of some in progress tails, I'm trying to understand how you move from that to a nice smooth surface.

Sorry Isaac, that was my misunderstanding the question.  You asked it right, I just didn't receive well.  I do need to chisel the "bottoms" of the tails flat as I do not have a 7 degree ground blade.  You can see Michael Pekovich using one here.

Custom Blade.JPG

Michael went with a 7-1/2" degree blade.  I chose not to split hairs and went with 7 degrees. I have never been a heavy user of dovetails but, people expect them so I thought I would try this out and see if it would inspire me to use them more often.  I didn't want to drop the money on a custom ground blade till I was convinced that I would make use of it.

As you can see from the picture, even with the custom ground blade there is some chisel work to flatten the bottom between the tails.  The major benefit of the custom grind is the perfect corners of the pin holes.  The material to be removed is really minor and if you scribe both faces and use the scribe mark as a chisel reference it is pretty fool proof . . . providing you have a narrow, dovetail style chisel so you don't foul the corners.

If I am still not answering the question, hit me again.  It will sink in sooner or later ;-)

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1 hour ago, gee-dub said:

Sorry Isaac, that was my misunderstanding the question.  You asked it right, I just didn't receive well.  I do need to chisel the "bottoms" of the tails flat as I do not have a 7 degree ground blade.  You can see Michael Pekovich using one here.

Custom Blade.JPG

Michael went with a 7-1/2" degree blade.  I chose not to split hairs and went with 7 degrees. I have never been a heavy user of dovetails but, people expect them so I thought I would try this out and see if it would inspire me to use them more often.  I didn't want to drop the money on a custom ground blade till I was convinced that I would make use of it.

As you can see from the picture, even with the custom ground blade there is some chisel work to flatten the bottom between the tails.  The major benefit of the custom grind is the perfect corners of the pin holes.  The material to be removed is really minor and if you scribe both faces and use the scribe mark as a chisel reference it is pretty fool proof . . . providing you have a narrow, dovetail style chisel so you don't foul the corners.

If I am still not answering the question, hit me again.  It will sink in sooner or later ;-)

This answers it. I was trying to see if you had some magic way using only a table saw to get a perfectly flat and parallel base across the entire tail bottom. I'm mentally comparing this process it a router jig, which does leave a smooth bottom, though you can have other issues, like tear out, to wrestle with.

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Only reawakening this thread because I have to do a demo for a class next week. There is a simple way of cleaning to the corners of the tails without having a specially ground blade. A quick Youtube search yielded this gem from way back...

 

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