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dewaxed shellac question

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Howdy

I have a question about using a sanding sealer (dewaxed shellac).
I'm working on a bench made of Walnut right now.

I'm planning to use oil as the primary finish.

I would also like to fill the pores prior to finishing.

My understanding is the primary benefit of dewaxed shellac is allowing finishes to adhere to it.

But is it also good for oils that need to penetrate, or would it get in the way of that happening?

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Doug Carlson said:

Howdy

I have a question about using a sanding sealer (dewaxed shellac).
I'm working on a bench made of Walnut right now.

I'm planning to use Odie's oil as the primary finish.

I would also like to fill the pores prior to finishing.

My understanding is the primary benefit of dewaxed shellac is allowing finishes to adhere to it.

But is it also good for oils that need to penetrate, or would it get in the way of that happening?

 

 

I would think it would get in the way of an oil as it will seal the wood. Easy enough to try a test piece and prove me wrong though :)

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I am not saying it is wrong but walnut does not strike me as a wood that needs pore filling.  I think of pore fills on real open pore woods like oak so your finish doesn't have such drastic difference in color because of the deep grain patterns.  I use a lot of shellac, I use it mainly to make the grain stand out before I spray water borne finish because the water borne finish doesn't really provide any pop.  

If you skip the pore fill you won't need the shellac, the oil finish should provide all the pop you need.  I don't have any direct experience with Odie's Oil but I don't think you would get the proper results with shellac under it.

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If you want to fill the pores, here is an old technique that is oil-compatible:

After raising the grain and sanding to a finish grit, use a rolled-up cotton cloth as a applicator, moisten it with water, dab it into dry plaster of paris powder, the rub it into the wood. Circular motions, wax on, wax off style. Moisten, dab, repeat. Let dry and sand to finish grit again. Then apply the oil. Shellac would go over the (fully cured) oil if a more durable finish is needed. But Odie's looks really good on walnut.

This filling technique has been used for many decades by makers of grand pianos, to achieve the glossy smooth finish. I've used it on red oak with good success. Plaster can be mixed with dye if desired, or left natural. It absorbs oil finish and becomes translucent.

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Thanks all. Was really just wondering yea or nay using a sealer before an oil.
 

Looks like it will not do any favors. I'll skip it

 

Take care.

 

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Shellac will seal the wood pore, it is a film finish.  If you want the oil look, put it directly on the wood. As someone mentioned, it is a good idea to do a test 1st. Any cutoff ? After spending a lot of time and $ on the lumber, spending 20-40$ to test different finish is not a bad idea, and then, you will know for sure.

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