Grizzly 6" jointers


cowchaser
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Does anyone here have any of the grizzly 6" jointers? As much as I would rather have an 8" I just can't bring myself to go through the expense of putting in the plug, plus the cost of new equipment. Other than wanting a bigger one do you have any gripes or concerns about yours? Anyone have the shopfox 1755 model they have on sale? It does have a longer bed, but no sure about anything else on it. Just trying to get some things together so I can get going here. Maybe I will be better off just buying a lunchbox planer and jointing on my tablesaw. It's like trying to negotiate a maze. All confused.

I really do appreciate all the patience everyone has shown me. Guess you could say I am tryng to break out of my shell about being bashful asking for help. If you prefer to email me or PM me that is fine. I read them all.

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I have an older Grizzly 6" jointer that I picked up second hand about a year ago. It is a fine machine and it came with the upgraded quick change knives. This really makes it a breeze to change knives as there is no more setting them. I do plan on getting a larger one, but Grizzly is probably the only brand I will consider because of the cost. I will warn that this is a slippery slope because the jointer was useful, but really shines when combined with a planer. It is just one piece of the puzzle to get stock flat and co-planer. I highly recommend looking at craigs-list and here for used ones. Being new to the hobby I am always looking for a good deal and a chance to upgrade. I plan on selling mine one day, so someone else will get a good deal.

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I used to have a 6" Grizzly jointer made in 2003. It was a fine machine and did a great job for me till I bought an old 8" powermatic jointer and rebuilt it. I would second buying from craigslist but I would caution you that unless your tool is quite new (less then 5 years) you should expect to have to do some work on it, at the very least change out some bearings. This is really rather easy to do but some folk don't want the bother. In Maryland it is pretty easy to buy a used 6" jointer in ready to use condition for around 200 dollars.

Next to my table saw the jointer is the most used power tool in my shop. A planer is probably third in that list.

There is very little reason for the hobbiest to upgrade from a 6" to an 8" jointer. The only reason I did was because I got a great deal on the 8" powermatic. The main reason to want to upgrade is if you are face planing boards that are between 6 and 8 inches.

You mention though you don't want the expense of the "plug." If you mean 3 phase power there is no reason you need to have it for an 8" jointer. Most 8" jointers are using 2hp or less and you can easily find single phase motors in that size. Alternatively you can buy a VFD which will run you between 120 and 250 depending on the size you need.

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I used to have a 6" Grizzly jointer made in 2003. It was a fine machine and did a great job for me till I bought an old 8" powermatic jointer and rebuilt it. I would second buying from craigslist but I would caution you that unless your tool is quite new (less then 5 years) you should expect to have to do some work on it, at the very least change out some bearings. This is really rather easy to do but some folk don't want the bother. In Maryland it is pretty easy to buy a used 6" jointer in ready to use condition for around 200 dollars.

Next to my table saw the jointer is the most used power tool in my shop. A planer is probably third in that list.

There is very little reason for the hobbiest to upgrade from a 6" to an 8" jointer. The only reason I did was because I got a great deal on the 8" powermatic. The main reason to want to upgrade is if you are face planing boards that are between 6 and 8 inches.

You mention though you don't want the expense of the "plug." If you mean 3 phase power there is no reason you need to have it for an 8" jointer. Most 8" jointers are using 2hp or less and you can easily find single phase motors in that size. Alternatively you can buy a VFD which will run you between 120 and 250 depending on the size you need.

Not worried about 3ph. What is is, is I don't have 220 in the garage. I don't have space (atleast don't think I do) in the breaker box. Only upside is my house does have 200 amp service just the breaker box is older from the 80's and i am not sure what it would cost to upgrade it to accept more breakers or what it would cost me to add 220 to the garage. Sorry for the confusion. I believe I only have 13 places for breakers and currently am using 10 of those. I am not sure what code calls for here, but assume I need to leave atleast 2 open at all times.

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Not worried about 3ph. What is is, is I don't have 220 in the garage. I don't have space (atleast don't think I do) in the breaker box. Only upside is my house does have 200 amp service just the breaker box is older from the 80's and i am not sure what it would cost to upgrade it to accept more breakers or what it would cost me to add 220 to the garage. Sorry for the confusion. I believe I only have 13 places for breakers and currently am using 10 of those. I am not sure what code calls for here, but assume I need to leave atleast 2 open at all times.

If you have two open spaces, then you have enough room to put in 220 to the shop. Dont quote me, but I dont htink that you need to have open space in you panel. I have like a 40 space in my house panel and it is full minus 2 spots I think.. I am going to fill those when I finish my basement. You can always add a subpanel to give you more spaces. I also took 100A and ran it out into my new garage. I have power for days. I use it too, just look at my bill..

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When I needed 240V for my dust collector, my electrician replaced two normal 120 breakers with a double half-height breaker. A half-height breaker fits in a normal slot and has two circuit breakers on it. They can make them smaller now, so they can fit two in the space of one. With a double half-height you have four breakers and can have two 240V or four 120V or, what I did, was replace two 120V circuits with two 120V circuits and a 240V.

So, even if you have no space in your panel, if you've got the amps you can have a 240V circuit.

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Not worried about 3ph. What is is, is I don't have 220 in the garage. I don't have space (atleast don't think I do) in the breaker box. Only upside is my house does have 200 amp service just the breaker box is older from the 80's and i am not sure what it would cost to upgrade it to accept more breakers or what it would cost me to add 220 to the garage. Sorry for the confusion. I believe I only have 13 places for breakers and currently am using 10 of those. I am not sure what code calls for here, but assume I need to leave atleast 2 open at all times.

Your in luck then. There are plenty of motors that are 2hp and less that run off of 110 volt. Heck even my Ridgid Table saw which is 1.5hp (as compared to my 1hp motor on my 8" powermatic) is only 110volt.

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anyone have any input on what you think the best route to go would be? Or should I just go with the planer idea and joint on my tablesaw?

I have this bad boy, and absolutely love it.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-Parallelogram-Jointer/G0604X

The in-feed and out-feed tables are longer than most other 6" jointers (beneficial when jointing long boards), and it has 4 knives instead of the typical 3, so it produces a better finish.

IMO, don't joint on the table saw, your never going to get a finish as good as you would with a real jointer. With regards to 6" vs 8" vs larger, buy the 6" and a #7 or #8 hand plane for the wide boards. At the wood suppliers I frequrnt the wide boards are normally in the 10" - 15" range, so an 8" isn't really any better than a 6" as you still need to rip the board in half and then joint the narrower boards. To truly deal with wide boards you need a 10+" machine and that's completely different animal. They are bigger (7+' long), heavier (800+ lbs), and in some cases produce a worse finish because the cutting head spins slower.

The ultimate solution would be to have two jointers, one big, and one small. If memory serves, David Marks has an 18" and a 6" (or was it 4).

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