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mtbercrash40

Stationary Table Saws and Portable Table Saws

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Hey guys.  I'm researching and shopping around for a new table saw for my shed and do it yourself stuff for fun. I noticed that a large stationary saw that is around $500 has a motor delivering 3500 to 4500 RPM's.  And the portable saws costing around $250 - $400, have motors in them that blast 5000 RPM's!  

Why is that?

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Probably different diameter blades, so the speed at the cutting edge is about the same.

 

Here's a picture of our portable table saw.

post-14184-0-89380200-1387045541_thumb.j

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Universal motors need more rpm. Without it they would not have enough power.

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There is also some marketing involved at times. Portables are more than likely direct drive while stationary utilize stepped pulley sizes to gain arbor rotation vs motor rotation.

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So if Im just a beginner and want to tinker around with woodworking for a hobby,..then I shouldn't be concerned about RPM's when purchasing one?

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Get a Delta 36-725   I can't post a link, but do a search.  $599 at Lowes.

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Unless your intention is to never cut anything bigger than a two-foot section of 2x6, don't waste money on a cheap bench top saw. You will never be satisfied with the performance compared to even a low end contractor saw. Not to saw there aren't good portable saws; they just aren't cheap.

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Probably different diameter blades, so the speed at the cutting edge is about the same.

Here's a picture of our portable table saw.

That is so bad ass!

Sent from my thumbs

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Tjhey have different types of motors and drive systems.  Most of the stationary saws have a belt drive induction motor.  Most portables have a direct drive universal motor.  Induction motors tend to have more torque, while universal motors tend to rely on higher RPM for their cutting power.  I wouldn't give the RPM much thought, but the performance and reliability advantages are heavily in favor of the belt drive induction motors and the full size stationary saws.  Induction motors are also considerably quieter. 

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The tablesaw is typically the center of the workshop. You can use it for so many thing aside from producing square panels. Got raw wood with live edge - not square and don't have a jointer? Well the tablesaw can still safely cut it with a straight edge jig. Want to do a raised panel, yep t.s. can do that too..  Spend what you can and get a decent setup. If you can go the $500 route I would recommend looking at better quality used saws. If you have never used a table saw or owned one before, buying used can be tricky - here is a short list of things to look for, do your research or bring a friend in the know:

 

1. Listen to the motor running, and let it run a few minutes to check for heat buildup.
2. Check tilt, raise/lower for smoothness. Check gears for chipped or missing teeth.
3. Grab blade and check side to side play.
4. Check for wobble/parallel of blade.
5. Check table for flatness.
6. Miter gauge fit.
7. Rip fence locking and parallel to blade/miter slot.
8. Check trunnions.
9. Take belt off to check motor and arbor bearings with no load.
10. Sight rails.
11. Five sided cut method

 

If you must have new, maybe bump up to about $700 and take a look at some of the grizzly offerings. They both have riving knives which makes using the guards much easier - i.e. take the guard off and you still have the rk when doing dadoes.

 

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Contractor-Style-Saw/G0732 $695 1.5hp

http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Hybrid-Table-Saw-with-Riving-Knife-Polar-Bear-Series-/G0715P $795 2hp

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Been thinking about this a lot too recently, has anyone had experience of the Metabo portable table saw? Don't really have room in my workshop for a high end tablesaw; however, the Metabo would be perfect as I can store out of the way when needed and would obviously be portable enough to take to site.

 

~WW

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