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Guest Sunny

Can I strip and stain this burl veneer?

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Guest Sunny

I got a Ming coffee table with veneer burp top with the hopes of staining it darker/getting more depth to the burl—would love it to be more like the below statement piece. I’ve stripped and restrained pieces my entire life, but new to veneer... Does anyone have advice on stripping, and how to build up the stain to achieve greater depth?  My piece seems like it’s just a poly coat over natural wood, very light yellow, think it’ll be beautiful if I can not muss it up. Attached pictures of the piece I’d like to achieve, sadly my piece isn’t on the internet—but it’s basically light everywhere, there isn’t any depth. Thank you!!!Burled-WOod-Table-top.jpg

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Commercial veneers can be extremely thin, so keep the sanding to a minimum. Use a gentle chemical stripper and patience to remove the existing finish, and beware that even that may soften the glue. You've been warned.

As for re-coloring, burl gets its beauty from the swirling grain, so I would use an oil-based stain, flood it on and wipe it back almost immediately to get contrast between the grain pores and smooth wood.

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Honestly, I can't see stain improving that burl. It's beautiful. If you must stain it, please use a light touch. Less is more.

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Guest Sunny
19 hours ago, drzaius said:

Honestly, I can't see stain improving that burl. It's beautiful. If you must stain it, please use a light touch. Less is more.

@drzaius, I agree— that’s what I am hoping to achieve, but what I currently have is so light the swirls are barely visible. 

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Guest Sunny
19 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Commercial veneers can be extremely thin, so keep the sanding to a minimum. Use a gentle chemical stripper and patience to remove the existing finish, and beware that even that may soften the glue. You've been warned.

As for re-coloring, burl gets its beauty from the swirling grain, so I would use an oil-based stain, flood it on and wipe it back almost immediately to get contrast between the grain pores and smooth wood.

@wtnhighlander Thank you!!!! You are right, I’m so worried, but hopefully I’m right and it’s just an epoxy coat since there is no coloration...trying this weekend, will try to send y’all an update

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Maybe you should post a picture of the actual piece you have, might give people here a better idea of methods you could use, or be honest with you that you may want something that is not possible.

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I have never worked with burl but just by going from other woods (syp), is the darker part of the burl harder than the lighter wood and if so, won’t the lighter wood take the stain more, thus providing just the opposite of what you’re after. Just wondering? 

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