Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Pug

Ridgid 5" RO sander r2601

5 posts in this topic

My sander died a few weeks ago (in the middle of a project of course), so I brought it in for a repair. After a day, the tech called me and told me that ridgid no longer makes my sander (r2600). Because ridgid cannot repair the tool, they said they would send me a replacement.

A week later a refurbished r2601 arrives from FedEx. I take it to task right away, and I was dissapointed with the unit.

First, it does what it is supposed to do. It sands and orbits just fine, and the dust collection is quite good when using the dust deputy.

The issue is that I feel ridgid "cheaped out" when designing this sander. Many of the features that I chose the previous model for are now removed. The 2600 had an extra long cord and a nice Velcro cord wrap, as well as an illuminated cord end. It also came in a hard case. All of these features are gone now, the cord wrap replaced by a cheap moulded clip and the case a soft bag. The previous model also came with two pads, one Velcro and one adhesive pad. Ridgid no longer includes the adhesive pad.

I would not buy this tool today. It's a good temporary replacement; I will use it for a while before I buy a higher quality unit. To be fair though, it's a relatively inexpensive unit to begin with.

post-6372-0-35511000-1376088275_thumb.jp

Mike. likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's very disappointing. I also have the 2600 and really considered it to be an awesome value for the money for all of the reasons you mentioned. I guess I'll have to make this one last as long as I can!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franklin - Do you know what part broke? I have ordered multiple parts for my 2600 (in fact, just ordered another brake and a new bearing, because it trashed two brakes in a matter of hours. Thus far it's been incredibly easy to repair myself. I can't fathom that Ridgid can't repair the tool when I can easily order new parts from ridgidparts.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Franklin - Do you know what part broke? I have ordered multiple parts for my 2600 (in fact, just ordered another brake and a new bearing, because it trashed two brakes in a matter of hours. Thus far it's been incredibly easy to repair myself. I can't fathom that Ridgid can't repair the tool when I can easily order new parts from ridgidparts.com.

The tech told me it was a circuit board, or module, or something similar sounding. He told me ridgid no longer had parts for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I see one PCB (printed circuit board) and yep, it's one of the "not available parts." That's a shame. I guess I'll get getting a different sander when this one finally kicks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • All,    I'm through a period in my life where I wasn't able to woodwork and I've got a 9 month old son (FYI), my family and I are living in Germany for another year or two. When we moved here I sold all of my large tools (save money for incoming baby and multiple moves in the short term). So now I'm looking to start fresh, I have multiple rooms in my basement, and I'm looking at options. One room is large with a cement floor but only ONE German power outlet by the light switch. The other is just as large but has the washer, dryer, power panels, etc. The upside to the second room is that it has multiple American outlets as the house is wired for both. Now for the tool options: Option 1: Go essentially all hand tools and use this time to hone all of those skills. I'm talking ripping and crosscutting with Disstons, milling boards by hand, etc. Option 2: Since I am in Germany.... I could get some Festool and go for the more hybrid approach. I don't think it's feasible to get a table saw over here and I have all of the electrical issues to account for if I go with Option 2. Specifically: I could buy US tools online, or buy German tools and deal with transformers and possible US resale value decrease in the long term, since I'll eventually be back in the States.   Thoughts?   (Good to be back!)
    • I have a friend that built a 10' x 28" long Roubo.  5" thick European beech.  No sag.  It makes my Roubo look like a toy.  I think you will want to beef up the leg dimensions, but that's mainly for aesthetics. At 4' wide you are at 2 Roubo width. Just build 2, and only put vises on one side. Later in life, you can sell one and move the other into your home shop. 
    • OK, That looks similar to mine after 3 coats. and the c hange in color with the oil confirms what my ample board told me.  I am going to use flat water base poly (2 coats) because I need a little more protection for the wood.  I will let you know how it turns out.  Thanks for the response.    It might be interesting to make my own since the little bags a woodcraft are pricey.
    • It's about time. I'm surprised it took so long.
    • Applying poly as topcoat on BLO is not uncommon but I have not done it on top of milk paint. As far milk paint goes, part of the attraction of it is the fact that it is "uneven", unlike latex paint.  I ended up appreciating the variations in the color of the milk paint.  The part that appealed the most to me was that you can see and feel the texture of the wood despite the milk paint.  I am posting a couple pics of my workbench that I painted with blue milk paint.  Don't get discouraged.  Just go through the proper steps, let the end product sit for a while and I am going to guess the you will come to appreciated it, like I did. Here is the milk paint after it was sanded to 220: Here is the end product after 2 coats of Danish oil: Closer view of the panels, and I think the panel below has had only one coat of Danish oil. Moral of the story: If I can make milk paint work, anyone can!
  • Popular Contributors

  • Who's Chatting

    There are no users currently in the chat room