gmercer_48083

Make a Laminated Plane

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Gary, that is very tidy work. Using your method is very useful in a powertool setting. How are they to use? I'd imagine very nicely?

I've not needed to make any before. If I did I would like to try the style shown by Roubo. They look more approachable from a hand tool project perspective. The attached is a great guide to making them. Almost as detailed as yours! ☺

RouboH&Rs.pdf

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12 hours ago, G S Haydon said:

Gary, that is very tidy work. Using your method is very useful in a powertool setting. How are they to use? I'd imagine very nicely?

I've not needed to make any before. If I did I would like to try the style shown by Roubo. They look more approachable from a hand tool project perspective. The attached is a great guide to making them. Almost as detailed as yours! ☺

RouboH&Rs.pdf 694.26 kB · 3 downloads

So far, all the hand planes I have made work well. My hollow was the first plane I made... and I copied my plane from the antique... only I used laminations so I could use my table saw/miter saw to guarantee precise angles. I found out along the way, that making the wedge was the most difficult part of the process. I made a jig that solved that. After that I wondered if a common 2x4 would work, so the next plane I made was a rebate plane using the same sawing methods and it worked quite well. On the third plane (a skewed rebate plane) I modified the angles of the cuts to 15 degrees (bed and breast) so the iron and the wedge are at 15 degrees. This makes the plane work well when making a rebate across end grain.

My suggestion to you if considering making a hand plane is to start with a rebate plane. It would be the simplest to make. I used O-1 Steel (Starrett brand) 1/8"x1/2" ground annealed. You don't need to make an oven to do the heat treating... just a Bernzomatic propane torch, and cooking oil to quench.

I guarantee if you make one... you will make more.

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As if there aren't enough projects on my plate and you go and add another one! This is really cool I will make something like this some day. I think the first one that would be to adapt this to make a chamfer plane. Woodpeckers made one out of bright flashy aluminum but a wood body plane seems far more compelling especially if i make it myself.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

As if there aren't enough projects on my plate and you go and add another one! This is really cool I will make something like this some day. I think the first one that would be to adapt this to make a chamfer plane. Woodpeckers made one out of bright flashy aluminum but a wood body plane seems far more compelling especially if i make it myself.

Typically I chamfer using any flat bottom plane for this. I don't see a real advantage in a chamfer plane, although a vee groove could be plan,d into making a rebate plane... or for that matter... you could route a pattern into the sole to create a profile. In order to add a profile to the sole you have to plan ahead so the mouth is not opened too much. I made a beading plane that way.

Like I said … Start with a rebate plane to get an understanding, and I guarantee you will see the possibilities and make more. 

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I usually start my hand plane making endeavors by using Sketchup to draw a plan, so I have an idea as to what I have to do and in what order I have to do them. This is what helped me think through the process. To use a round plane properly... you start out with a rebate in the wood as a guide for the round to follow. The round is held a 45 degrees to the rebate as you plane the wood which forms the profile.

The "Rounding Plane" forms the hollow (inside) in the wood and the "Hollow Plane" forms the round (outside) the wood.

Planes can be made for left or right direction also to deal with wood grain direction also.

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21 hours ago, gmercer_48083 said:

Typically I chamfer using any flat bottom plane for this. I don't see a real advantage in a chamfer plane, although a vee groove could be plan,d into making a rebate plane... or for that matter... you could route a pattern into the sole to create a profile. In order to add a profile to the sole you have to plan ahead so the mouth is not opened too much. I made a beading plane that way.

Like I said … Start with a rebate plane to get an understanding, and I guarantee you will see the possibilities and make more. 

I just want to be lazy and not have to put any thought into getting close to a 45 degree angle.The exact angle doesn't matter one bit but sometimes i get off and have to finesse corners so the y match up.

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Not only is woodpeckers chamfer plane pricey... I suppose when the nice shiny red finish rubs off... the aluminum will mar the wood like a pencil. Those marks don't erase like a pencil mark. Ha Ha.

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