Sanding gadgets


wtnhighlander
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Looking for suggestions for sanding smaller concave surfaces, such as might be found in a sculpted piece. I'm open to purchase or construct, but what I have for motive power is limited to a drill, a dremel, or an oscillating multi-tool.  Spherical, semi-spherical, or mop-style sanders would be better than a wherl or disc. Need to get down to a couple of inches in diameter, at least.

Ideas, anyone? 

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If I am targeting your description well . . . I have had good success with these.

https://tinyurl.com/2xk9n75y

https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-511E-Coarse-Finishing-Abrasive/dp/B000FBF3OM

I also use "new wave" discs and pads of various sizes and densities:

https://tinyurl.com/4eyvzeep

https://www.ptreeusa.com/abrasive_bowl_sanding.html

For fixed profiles I use contour sanding pads.  I just ordered some more as I managed to lose a couple While Standing At The Bench!?!

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All of gee-dub's suggestions are good considerations.  I think the Dremel "buffs" work better than the "brushes", but both may be small for your needs..  For something bigger Klingspor sells non-woven abrasive scuff & buff balls that are 2" in diameter that take a 1/4" chuck. 

https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/bb90202/

They have an assortment of other flap sanders, etc., as well.

FWW had a tip recently, too.  Wrap sandpaper around a socket (or other cylinder) of the right diameter.

 

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Thanks guys, these look likegood options. @Mark J, do those buff balls get aggressive enough to remove scratches down in the 40 grit range? I'm 'power carving' some bowls / dishes with an angle grinder, and the issue for now is that my ROS diameter is larger than the grinder disk, limiting the practical radius of the hollows I can make. This country boy ain't about to start hand-sanding these things!

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22 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

This country boy ain't about to start hand-sanding these things!

LOL.  

I have never used the the Klingspor balls, but I have used the smaller Dremel ones.  Because it's motor driven a given grit is more effective than you'd think.  I would still start with the coarsest and work up.  The non-woven material wears away under use, so there's a natural "discard" point.  

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I've used a drill-mounted paint stripper pad for rough smoothing before. Sometimes I'll chuck it into my drill-press to clean up an interior bandsaw cut before going to the spindle sander to save time. Might be a good first pass after the grinder before getting into the smaller dremel sanding tools.

https://www.amazon.com/3M-7772ES-Paint-Rust-Stripper/dp/B002E9IQ9M/ref=psdc_228914_t1_B000BQT4UK

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Coming off an angle grinder you may find burrs to be the next step between grinder (Arbor tech or the like) and abrasives.  Single cuts are faster but leave a rougher surface.  Double cut burrs are kind of like powered files ;-)  These are small ones but they come in a really wide variety.  Unless your bowls involve a small radii undercut lip or base a pear shape offers a really wide range of use.  HTH

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