Finishing butcherblock for outdoor table


EasyD
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello friends. So, some time back, my dad picked up a large haul of gorgeous butcherblock from the side of the road. While the big slab (8 foot long) is earmarked for our new workbench, I cut and routed a smaller slab for a deck table. I've applied the stain, and I have a 2-part epoxy for the surface: problem is, the epoxy doesn't provide the weatherproofing I need. I actually used an Identical slab already, thinking the epoxy would protect it, but it only lasted a few months before the warping of the different slats made it unpresentable, so I tossed it. This time around, I'd like to get some serious lifespan out of the table (seeing as how it's so pretty). I was thinking of some kind of finish that will penetrate a bit, followed by the pour-on epoxy, with a few topcoats of spar urethane (for UV/extra protection). What would y'all recommend? Thanks,

Easy

20210720_132920.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No finish is going to provide enough protection for a wooden table to sit outside that is not constructed from a wood good for it, nor a construction method appropriate for it.

In short, there is no long term solution for this.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom is right. Fully encapsulating the block in an outdoor epoxy finish may get you a little more time, but eventually, nature will win. That looks like maple, not the most weather resistant species, and the laminated butcher block is not a good construction for resisting the movement that outdoor moisture changes induce.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. I did find this "Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer" after some searching, and it lists butcherblock under its applications, but I suppose I'll need to keep it under the awning all the same: https://www.amazon.com/TotalBoat-Penetrating-Epoxy-Quart-Traditional/dp/B0141F71II/ref=sr_1_3?crid=17S94QPXR1M84&dchild=1&keywords=clear%2Bpenetrating%2Bepoxy%2Bsealer&qid=1628819899&sprefix=clear%2Bpenet%2Caps%2C208&sr=8-3&th=1

That said, I'd also like something to provide some UV protection (living down in South Florida, and all): what can I apply on top of the above-linked epoxy so as to provide UV protection? Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Total Boat is a good product, but for what you are planning, you are going to want something that is easily repairable.  At a minimum any epoxy is going to require that you sand down the old finish.  If the table is going to be under an awning, and not directly exposed to the elements I would look at "hard wax" products.  I have a butcher block table on my deck that I used osmo poly x  for the finish.  The poly x is intended for interior flooring and furniture, and not for outdoor furniture, but, they do make products that offer UV protection and help to resist warping.  I used the poly x  because it is what I had in my shop.  That being said it has held up well, it is very easy to to repair, and there is no visible warping or other problems after several years.  I live in the north west, and our weather is not comparable, but we do have year round high humidity, and this year our summer temps have been consistently in the high 90s.  Our table is under an awning and exposed to direct diffused sun. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The owner of this site, The Wood Whisperer, Marc Spagnuolo, recently did a video on the condition of past outdoor projects that he had built and the condition of them several years later. His conclusion was that UV took it’s toll far more significantly than moisture did. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello friends, thought I'd post a quick update: I found "clear penetrating epoxy", a two part mix, that is specifically meant for outdoor applications. I did an initial pour, and, after thickening but before fully curing, poured another layer of traditional 2-part epoxy. After that was good and cured (about a week later), I gave the surface a good scuffing, and am now finishing with multiple coats of spar urethane as a topcoat (for extra sealing, abrasion, and UV resistance). It's looking good (so far), but I had an issue with the urethane that I could use some advice on: I poured some leftover poly (that had been thinned about 70 poly/30 paint thinner) back in the can, and at next use, it was quite milky in appearance (while in the jar). Is this a problem? If so, is there anything I can do to salvage the poly, or is it ruined? You can see in the pic, the jar on the left is the one to which I'm referring, the jar on the right (which has separated into 2 layers, with the bottom milky) is new. Thanks,

Easy

20211004_160342.jpg

20210916_121050.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share