Table Saw Cross Cut Sled


Stampy

Recommended Posts

Yeah, I was thinking that it only needs to ride in one slot making it easier to handle.

I don't know, I tried that once and it felt really off balance to me. Especially when you have longer cutoff pieces. I also found that when you are completely on one side of the blade, there's a second when you make the cut that you can't see the blade and the next time you can. it's behind the sled open and uncovered which made me a little nervous as I found myself using my right hand more towards the right side of the sled to put more strength into the part going through the blade. It just made me uncomfortable to use that sled.

It also had an issue with cutting smaller crosscuts (like 1" x 2" when you cut off a 2 or 3") piece where sometimes when it got to the end of the cut, it would throw the cutoff piece off the table. You'd be standing to the left of the blade so it wasn't crazy dangerous but it was disconcerting when it happened. Usually not with a lot of force like a kickback but enough to throw you off your game. :blink:

My newer sled rides in both slots and has a area behind it when the blade comes through that is completely surounded for 8 inches or so. It has a plexiglass cover over it as a chip guard and so I can see where the blade is at all times. My hands can't get anywhere near the blade no matter where I put them on the back of the sled.

I can get very consistent, repeatable cuts while staying safely behind the jig. It just works for me...

-Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right on! Some very valuable advice there guy's thanks for that.

It would seem that a guy could use 2 or 3 of these. 1 larger, one for smaller tasks and another for a dado stack for box joints and such.

In your collective opinions is MDF appropriate for the base?

1/2 inch? Or 3/4?

Thanks again.

Stampy ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are tons of magazine articles out there on CrossCut Sleds.

But right now Handyman Magazine has a very simple to build and basic crosscut sled in the issue that is currently on the newstand. You can recognize the issue because there is a large pergola on the cover. It may help to answer some of your questions.

If you need additional resources let me know.

I'm kind of anal about my mags and so I have a descent cataloging system and I can probably direct you to no less then 5 articles on building CrossCut sleds.

Good luck.

Chet

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1/2 inch is more than enough. 3/4" just wastes valuable cutting height, & makes it more difficult to move around the shop, because of the extra weight.

I second the 1/2". My current sled is 3/4" ply because that's what I had lying around at the time and it weighs a ton. :)

You're probably going to find that you'll make a sled and use it a while then find all the stuff you'd like to do differently and make another one. I'm on generation 3 now but gen 4 I think is going to happen soon.

Lots of new ideas for how to make it better... thinner ply is just one B)

-Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Neat idea! I may steal it.

Here's what I'd do, off the top of my head. Essentially, make a sled that has a space for an insert, like a table saw insert. The insert fits into a recess that you cut with a router. It is held down by countersunk screws and captive nuts that are epoxied into the bed. Obviously, the screws and nuts are positioned far enough from the blade that there won't be any contact. Then, make some inserts that fit the recess, drill the holes and countersinks, screw the insert into the sled, and make your first cut to create the kerf. The cut will splt the insert completely in half, but since both sides are screwed in place you should be fine.

I might cut the recess a little under the back fence, so that the insert slips under the fence and there's no gap where the fence meets the insert. I think at the front this is not an issue; it's OK if the insert doesn't go all the way to the front fence, and there's a bit of chewed up sled bed exposed before the insert starts. That's assuming that you usually hold your piece against the back fence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I need to create a cross cut sled (two runner) that has a replaceable insert in the center. I want to be able to use one sled for both normal and dado blade cuts. Don't want two sleds. Looking for ideas on how to incorporate the changeable insert into the design

Good call SD. Now thats using your head! I like it! You could have the throat plate extend the whole width of the sled and mount it to the underside of the front and rear fence. That way it would be mounted into more substantial stock.

Sketch Up here I come......

Stampy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I need to create a cross cut sled (two runner) that has a replaceable insert in the center. I want to be able to use one sled for both normal and dado blade cuts. Don't want two sleds. Looking for ideas on how to incorporate the changeable insert into the design.

You guys have any ideas?

SD,

I think I saw just the one your looking for on the WoodSmith site under "free" plans. I was thinking of building it myself. I am pretty sure it has an adjustment for dado's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta make a cross cut sled for the table saw. I was thinking of making it left of the blade only, out of MDF.

Let me know what you think

Stampy

If you want accuracy and clean cuts, go with the full sled that rides in both slots and on both sides of the blade. You can get accuracy out of the left side only sled but the cut offs just fall off of the end. Left side only makes a great cut off sled for rough cutting to length on wide boards. I also have the dual runner, full size sled. They both have their advantages. I also made on for dados.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I need to create a cross cut sled (two runner) that has a replaceable insert in the center. I want to be able to use one sled for both normal and dado blade cuts. Don't want two sleds. Looking for ideas on how to incorporate the changeable insert into the design.

You guys have any ideas?

I've seen a solution to both needs, and provides an easy restoration to e a cross cut sled that has lost it's zero clearance. I've done it on my sled, and it works quite well. You can build it with either a 1/2" base and a 1/4" overlay, or a 3/4 " base and a 1/4" inset. They work the same, but the 3/4" base provides a bit more strength.

Basically, when you are building the sled, cut a channel dado in the base wide enough to accommodate any size dado set, as well as a regular blade. The config is like this: 3/4" dadoed to 1/2" for the insert area, say 2" wide, and cut the insert to fit the opening. Use screws to hold the 1/4" inserts in place. Then install the full width insert, and raise the blade up through it. Viola! Zero clearance and removable and replaceable inserts. This works for any blade combination. Hope this is of help.smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I would think that a "left side only sled" would be called a miter gauge with out the benefit of adjustable angles.

Also, I built my sled using 1/4" plywood for the base. I felt that the only thing the base does is hold the back fence 90 degrees to the miter slots and with the front fence which helps hold the whole thing together. Also, 1/4" ply gives me a little more cutting area on the blade.

Rog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have built the one from Eagle Lake woodworking, found here: http://www.eaglelake...Miter-Sled.aspx

It is by far the most used jig in my arsenal. There are 2 changes I would make to the design.

First, make the base of 1/2 " Finn-Birch plywood, with a second 1/4' layer of Finn-Birch, with a section set as a replaceable zero clearance insert. Second, build it to accommodate at least 24 1/2" insid, to enable use for larger projects.

My 2 cents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would think that a "left side only sled" would be called a miter gauge with out the benefit of adjustable angles.

"One slot" sleds can be useful for cutting a little off of a piece, for example for cutting tapers or squaring up one edge. I wouldn't want to do either with a miter gauge. But, I agree that they aren't the best for cross-cutting, unless you're just taking a bit off the end of the piece.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.