Resawing to make multiple pieces from 1 piece


oldman_pottering
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I will start this by letting you guys know that I know nothing and this could be a bit long but I can't explain it very well

I have a few pieces of Australian hardwood that I want to be able to use in some smaller projects and the timber needs to be resized to do this. I guess the dimensions of the pieces are not important as the same process would apply to whatever dimension the timber is ( I could be completely wrong too, feel free to correct). The one piece I have in mind at the moment though is 200mm W 35mm H 500mm L and is "machined" (I'm a mechanic and this is how I think of it, maybe it's S4S ?) straight and square but I want to "slice" it up into thinner pieces to be able to use it.

I have a good bandsaw and also a thickness planer and I can cut the first "slices" from the outside edges of this block and then run them through the planer because the piece I cut off will already have 1 machined / surfaced side to face down in the thicknesser and I can then mill the other side which will have bandsaw marks in it and obviously won't be 100% square.

I would like to know how I go about milling the "slices" I take from the middle of my block as each "slice" will have 2 non machined surfaces leaving me without a good reference edge to lay flat down in the planer / thicknesser.

I hope you guys understand what I'm trying to say

Regards

Geoff

 

Edited by oldman_pottering
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  • 2 months later...

As the above I did what was recommended and then left the timber in my shed untouched and now I have bananas

I realise wood moves but........do I need to keep repeating the process or is it a matter of using it as soon as possible after any milling process ?

I was hoping to make a simple keepsake box with basic joinery (probably rebates (rabbets) 

 

thanks 

Geoff

 

 

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If you can't use the material immediately, best practice calls for it to be stacked evenly, and restrained from moving, as much as possible. Uneven exposure to moisture in the will usually result in some movement, regardless.

True best practice is to mill in stages, evenly from all sides, and save the final dimensioning until as late as possible. Sorry your lumber took the turn that it did!

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On 11/21/2022 at 3:16 PM, wtnhighlander said:

If you can't use the material immediately, best practice calls for it to be stacked evenly, and restrained from moving, as much as possible. Uneven exposure to moisture in the will usually result in some movement, regardless.

True best practice is to mill in stages, evenly from all sides, and save the final dimensioning until as late as possible. Sorry your lumber took the turn that it did!

Thanks mate

It's all good, I think I will try and redo it when i'm ready to use it. it's approx 11mm thick at the moment, perhaps I can get to 8 mm and use it...............whatever happens I'm getting experience with my thicknesser AND making some nice sawdust

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On 11/20/2022 at 7:50 PM, oldman_pottering said:

I realise wood moves but........do I need to keep repeating the process or is it a matter of using it as soon as possible after any milling process ?

 

Early on I would prepare material so it would be "ready" for use.  My experience then was about like yours.  Now I mill material as I need it.  Another variant is that I make my large panels like table tops at the end of a build.  They get finished and attached pretty soon after making them; I don't leave them setting around.

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When i cut thin slices from a board i try and do that operation last and try and get the material in place as soon as possible. I have some 1/4" slices from 8/4 boards sitting around that have stayed flat for years but my shop is in my basement and the RH stays pretty consistent and changes slowly all things considered.

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On 11/21/2022 at 11:00 PM, gee-dub said:

Early on I would prepare material so it would be "ready" for use.  My experience then was about like yours.  Now I mill material as I need it.  Another variant is that I make my large panels like table tops at the end of a build.  They get finished and attached pretty soon after making them; I don't leave them setting around.

 

On 11/22/2022 at 2:24 AM, Chestnut said:

When i cut thin slices from a board i try and do that operation last and try and get the material in place as soon as possible. I have some 1/4" slices from 8/4 boards sitting around that have stayed flat for years but my shop is in my basement and the RH stays pretty consistent and changes slowly all things considered.

Thanks to both

From now on I'm just going to leave any milling to the end, I was trying to take my time and do things as best I could one step at a time but now I see I'm going to need to change that thought 

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Another trick I've seen used when material needs to sit longer than you initially anticipated. Wrap the material in plastic. The plastic will keep the moisture around the wood consistent and some people have mentioned that it helps stop movement. Stacking stickering and weighting I think was covered as well.

There are a lot of variables here though so it's not always a single silver bullet solution and you may need to just adjust. Also sometimes you have to work with what you've got. I've had to install cupped panels in frame and panel sides before in non-critical situations and just crossed my fingers that the rest of the case would hold things flat. This is not recommended but sometimes you can risk it.

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On 11/23/2022 at 1:24 AM, Chestnut said:

Another trick I've seen used when material needs to sit longer than you initially anticipated. Wrap the material in plastic. The plastic will keep the moisture around the wood consistent and some people have mentioned that it helps stop movement. Stacking stickering and weighting I think was covered as well.

There are a lot of variables here though so it's not always a single silver bullet solution and you may need to just adjust. Also sometimes you have to work with what you've got. I've had to install cupped panels in frame and panel sides before in non-critical situations and just crossed my fingers that the rest of the case would hold things flat. This is not recommended but sometimes you can risk it.

thank you

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