Freddie

Teak step box

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A friend of mine is a big boater, and he asked me to fix an old step box. Well, it was never maintained and completely rotted out, so it only made sense to clone it rather than repair it. The box is tapered in from the bottom to the top at 5 degrees all around. Construction is pretty straight forward, assembly consisted of west system epoxy, stainless steel screws and plugs. This project was all done with leftover materials, and the 4/4 teak I had had too much twist in it to yield 3/4" parts for a new lid. So I prepped the old lid for him the best I could, and it turned out decent enough. I am not applying the finish on this, my friend is. It will receive 3 coats of sickens cetol marine light. I can post finished photos after he is done. 

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I appreciate the time and effort that had to go into a little project like this ! The outcome is awesome! Very few people these days realize the effort and skill it takes to make something like this become a reality .

I had a client who was starting on a violin build. He got stuck at building a jig for the ribs and side frames. I was glad to cut a few parts and accurately taper the blank for the violin mould.

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I thought this looked familiar B) ...  Nice job!

It looks familiar because I stole the first image off google search! :)

 

Thanks for the love guys!

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Freddie's back! I was going to send a search party out to Long Island.

You weren't alone ! I reached out an messaged him a few days ago.

Funny, now that I think about it I have some teak and teak ply leftovers that need to get used on a project about that size or a little bigger.

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You weren't alone ! I reached out an messaged him a few days ago.

Funny, now that I think about it I have some teak and teak ply leftovers that need to get used on a project about that size or a little bigger.

Go for it Steve, its a badass little project! Teak is like my new favorite now, absolutely gorgeous before and after finish. Its not so caring on your hand tools, but it makes you sharpen. :)

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These pictures, the first really wants to show you how badly the old box wanted to retire. It was originally covered in that white marine poly-type of laminate, which was getting destroyed as the bottom of the box was dropping out. The second picture is my puppy son during this project coming into the shop to see how I was doing, what a guy! And second, I just love the floor in this piece, it is beveled at 5 deg all around and slid in from the bottom up, and secured with epoxy and 5 deg cleats. the corners are relieved in a circular fashion to drain water and look badass. 

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Nice job! Teak eats metal, and hates glue!  Love your assistant!

Oh yes, this is true! From these last few projects, all my beautiful lie nielsen and veritas hand tools are scratched to s#&t! I'm not even mad, it allowed me to get over the new car smell feeling and use them without obsessing over them, theyre tools after all! Teak is a very oily wood and contains silica, and that is what scratches tool iron and degrades cutting edges. I religiously used acetone to clean parts before glue ups and prior to finish. Going back a few months ago, I build a ice maker box for this same boat and I spoke with Andy Miller here from the forum to clear up and doubts I had about working with teak in a salt water setting, and I would like to give a shout out to him for the excellent advice, thanks buddy!

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Freddie's back! I was going to send a search party out to Long Island.

I thought he had taken time off to cover that insulation w/ sheetrock...but no :D  Good looking box

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I dont even have enough time to pass wind in my shop, let alone sheetrock. :) times are busy, hoping for a break soon.

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Was the original rotted step teak? I thought it would not rot.

Steve

 

The original box is made the same way I constructed mine. Ply for the case sides and bottom floor, cedar interior posts, and solid teak outer posts and lid. The handles are also solid. The box lasted for many many years, but neglect got the best of it. I told him to take better care of this one. :) 

 

- As for the old box, the ply and cedar rotted, while the teak, badly weathered, was intact. 

 

- This was a favor for a friend, we used what we had, which turned out to be the recipe for the original, and I only charged him $100 for labor. He gave me $125, whoopdedoo!

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I wanted to point out that while tool storage is all the rage, and some people are building dutch tool chests, why not consider a box of this style for hand tool storage. Its a very awesome looking box and will impress all your friends who walk into the shop. :)

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I wanted to point out that while tool storage is all the rage, and some people are building dutch tool chests, why not consider a box of this style for hand tool storage. Its a very awesome looking box and will impress all your friends who walk into the shop. :)

Could be a super secret storage box for your most prized tools when you are away. No one will ever suspect the quaint looking step stool in the corner holds a mass collection of LN planes and chisels :)

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As promised, here are the finished shots of the box. Disclaimer, I didn't do it! :) I stopped by my friends boat after work today to say hello, and finally got to see the box after finish. As you can see, the lid isn't the flattest board in the barn, but the top surface did clean up well enough for the shape it was in. He's happy, I'm happy, and I have him coming to install some backyard lights tomorrow, then we will be all bartered up. 

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