corded vs cordless


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I get it. On the job we had loads of battery tools in multiple kits. I tend to need more juice and less mobility in the shop. I cannot do any more than share my setup and whys. No one will fault you for wanting battery tools and many have gotten decent tools from various manufacturers. Don't take our preference as an attempt to talk you out of anything. We just try to be thorough. I bought a CL jointer and now have to recover before I can buy more lumber. Nice tool but it leaves me tinkering for awhile and not building. That affects my current leaning. 

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I get it. On the job we had loads of battery tools in multiple kits. I tend to need more juice and less mobility in the shop. I cannot do any more than share my setup and whys. No one will fault you for wanting battery tools and many have gotten decent tools from various manufacturers. Don't take our preference as an attempt to talk you out of anything. We just try to be thorough. I bought a CL jointer and now have to recover before I can buy more lumber. Nice tool but it leaves me tinkering for awhile and not building. That affects my current leaning. 

Your thorough-ness is why I pose the question before buying. I like to hear the opinions before I make a big choice because my experience is different than yours and yours is different than the next guy so if the majority of people prefer corded and a well set up shop over cordless than maybe I should look into setting up a better shop. However with the situation I'm in the shop may need to wait seeing as this place is not forever it is short term so time will tell Sent from my B15 using Tapatalk
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I should look into setting up a better shop. However with the situation I'm in the shop may need to wait seeing as this place is not forever it is short term so time will tell 

How many circuits & outlets are in your shop?

Half my shop shares a circuit with the utility room, and the other half with the Formal living room. Unill I got a cabinet saw (required a 220v circuit) I ran every tool in my shop of 3 110v outlets. 2 outlets where on one circuit and one on the other. 

$150 worth of properly sized extension cords and power strip/outlet adapters, lets me have everything set up and plugged in ready to go.

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How many circuits & outlets are in your shop?

Half my shop shares a circuit with the utility room, and the other half with the Formal living room. Unill I got a cabinet saw (required a 220v circuit) I ran every tool in my shop of 3 110v outlets. 2 outlets where on one circuit and one on the other. 

$150 worth of properly sized extension cords and power strip/outlet adapters, lets me have everything set up and plugged in ready to go.

If I'm lucky I have 2 plugs that I haven't looked into the circuits yet but I can run a thickness planer no issue. Air compressor and all the fun stuff but I end up shuffling tools around all the time and don't have enough ext. Cords and I can make up many more excuses but the fact of the matter is until I test out different set ups I can't truly decide on the best method for me Sent from my B15 using Tapatalk
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I can't for the life of me think of reason for a cordless miter saw. It's a stationary tool; you bring the wood to it. You don't carry it around the shop to each piece you are working on. And cordless saws always use really thin kerf blades, which is something you don't want on a miter saw.

I use cordless drills, drivers & occasionally a circ saw in the shop. The circ saw is actually pretty good, but it runs the battery down pretty fast. I used to have a Dewalt cordless circ saw, but it was so bad I tossed it.

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I can't for the life of me think of reason for a cordless miter saw. It's a stationary tool; you bring the wood to it. You don't carry it around the shop to each piece you are working on. And cordless saws always use really thin kerf blades, which is something you don't want on a miter saw.

I use cordless drills, drivers & occasionally a circ saw in the shop. The circ saw is actually pretty good, but it runs the battery down pretty fast. I used to have a Dewalt cordless circ saw, but it was so bad I tossed it.

There are plenty of reasons.  Building a gazebo that is not near an outlet would jump to my mind.  It is not something woodworkers would likely use but carpenters.  Though I guess it could be useful for breaking down lumber at the lumber yard.

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There are plenty of reasons.  Building a gazebo that is not near an outlet would jump to my mind.  It is not something woodworkers would likely use but carpenters.  Though I guess it could be useful for breaking down lumber at the lumber yard.

I'd use a cordless circular saw first.  

 

I like corded tools in addition to cordless tools for drills.  My cordless sawzall comes in really handy and the batteries last quite a  while, but it's really only good for demo/ really rough work.  I kinda want a cordless brad nailer but Milwaukee doesn't make one so I'll get an air version instead.  I always think back to my grandpa's tools, I'm still using his Craftsman jig saw from the 70's or 80's, but his old cordless drill was junk.  For anything I don't want to have to buy again I buy corded. 

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I'd use a cordless circular saw first.  

 

I like corded tools in addition to cordless tools for drills.  My cordless sawzall comes in really handy and the batteries last quite a  while, but it's really only good for demo/ really rough work.  I kinda want a cordless brad nailer but Milwaukee doesn't make one so I'll get an air version instead.  I always think back to my grandpa's tools, I'm still using his Craftsman jig saw from the 70's or 80's, but his old cordless drill was junk.  For anything I don't want to have to buy again I buy corded. 

The issue is what are you doing and how much.  For the average home owner and woodworker a cordless miter saw seems very pointless but making compound angle cuts on something like an octagon for a gazebo would be something I would think it would shine on.  And that is something I could see not having an outlet near.

 

I have my grandfathers corded drills.  The 1/4" chuck is really pretty annoying.  Fortunetly I have a set of drills up to 1/2" with 1/4" Shanks also from my grandfather.   This is the kind of thing I think about when people say "they don't make them like that anymore" and I think it is a good thing.

 

I am certainly not a big fan of cordless drills, there is a reason when I got a 1/4" impact driver to install a bathroom I went with corded, even though with batteries the cordless ones were basically the same price.

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I love cordless stuff because the new batteries are so much better than previous generations. And even further yes they die out after 5 years or so but with that being said if you buy bare tools they are similar price to a corded version. The only investment is batteries at that point and buying a battery is like buying new brushes for the DC motors. It's maintenance Sent from my B15 using Tapatalk

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I love cordless stuff because the new batteries are so much better than previous generations. And even further yes they die out after 5 years or so but with that being said if you buy bare tools they are similar price to a corded version. The only investment is batteries at that point and buying a battery is like buying new brushes for the DC motors. It's maintenance Sent from my B15 using Tapatalk

As long as they continue to manufacture the appropriate batteries.  I often see it is cheaper to buy a new tool than new batteries as well, or rather no more, as they typically throw in a drill for free with the price of two batteries.

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The more battery tools you have and the more you use them the less hassle the batteries are.  When you have more batteries than you need and enough chargers keeping batteries charged is a non issue.

Right now in the shop I only am using the battery drill, and leaf blower (I blow the dust, shavings, and chips out the roll up door).  I also use a battery string trimmer in the yard,  I am considering a battery circular saw and may consider others.

Some battery tools are just more easy and convenient to handle than corded ones.  I'd probably use battery random orbital sanders, except for the fact that I already have three corded ones that I keep ready to go with three different grits.  I often use the three usually for less than a minute each and in quick succession.  I probably use them 10 times a day most days and sometimes much more, so swapping abrasives became a hassle with one sander.

On the other hand I don't see much advantage to stationary tools like a miter saw being cordless in the typical shop.

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The more battery tools you have and the more you use them the less hassle the batteries are.  When you have more batteries than you need and enough chargers keeping batteries charged is a non issue.

Right now in the shop I only am using the battery drill, and leaf blower (I blow the dust, shavings, and chips out the roll up door).  I also use a battery string trimmer in the yard,  I am considering a battery circular saw and may consider others.

Some battery tools are just more easy and convenient to handle than corded ones.  I'd probably use battery random orbital sanders, except for the fact that I already have three corded ones that I keep ready to go with three different grits.  I often use the three usually for less than a minute each and in quick succession.  I probably use them 10 times a day most days and sometimes much more, so swapping abrasives became a hassle with one sander.

On the other hand I don't see much advantage to stationary tools like a miter saw being cordless in the typical shop.

i would say I have my fair share of tools of both corded and cordless and with the amount I use the tools (not incredibly often) cordless works well. ive been looking into a lot of tools lately and I find myself looking at all the new cordless tools and the brushless technology that keeps them working longer than ever before, why not invest into them? and the mitre saw is a great one because I do renovations and sometimes you only need a few cuts for door trim or to replace a small bathroom where you need it for a handful of cuts and you don't want to bring the stand or the cord out and you want to work off the tailgate for the height. cordless is in that niche market.. however I don't have any Makita cordless tools and they are the ones ive been looking into for some time now. because they have the most wood working friendly tools right now.

 

ive also been interested in the ridged brushless air nailers and the 18v sander... not sure if it would be worth investing for those 2 alone or not but im starting to realize that only brushless tools are worth investing in because there is next to 0 maintenance on them and they run longer on a battery.... im just interested to know why the corded tools aren't brushless yet to use less electricity and run more effectively ?

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Where do you find three phase hand tools?

As far as I know, no one makes 3 phase hand tools. Most likely because 3 phase is not often found in residential areas. In industrial settings they usually use pneumatic hand tools, because they are cheaper, and more robust than electric. 

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Where do you find three phase hand tools?

Actually, that's effectively what most of the brushless DC motors used in the brushless cordless tools are... Most of them are basically little synchronous 3-phase motors, and the circuitry in the tool generates the appropriate waveform to drive them (pretty much the same idea as a VFD on a full-size 3-phase tool).

 

Sorry, back to our regularly scheduled woodworking...

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