Delta unisaw identification help please!


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I'm hoping to purchase a Unisaw with serial number: 

95B93631

I was able to figure out it was made in 1994 by the site: wiki.vintagemachinery.org/DeltaSerialNumbers.ashx

But, I can't find any more info.  I'd really like to be able to research the saw before I buy.  Can anyone help me out with some info?  Anything I should watch out for?  I truly appreciate any sage advice y'all have.  

I've attached a pic if that helps.  

Thanks, 

Peter

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What fence is that? It's not OEM. Not much to say about the 1995 unisaw other than its pretty much the same saw(minus the motor) that delta made from 1940-2005ish? Workhorse light industry machine. 3hp single phase? If it's under $900, I'd say that's a no brainer purchase. 

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I'm not skilled at looking under the hood (what to look for)  Any hints on what I should be looking for that may indicate I'm buying a lemon?  I'm figuring I'll be replacing the blade and getting new inserts, and cast iron Is pretty straight forward.  I'm not mechanically inclined though with knowing a crappy motor, or worn parts. 

And non-specifically, are you happy with it?  

Thanks for replying Brendon.  

2 minutes ago, Pwk5017 said:

What fence is that? It's not OEM. Not much to say about the 1995 unisaw other than its pretty much the same saw(minus the motor) that delta made from 1940-2005ish? Workhorse light industry machine. 3hp single phase? If it's under $900, I'd say that's a no brainer purchase. 

Apparently it's an "accusquare".  I had NEVER seen it either.  Here's their website: http://www.mulecab.com/tablesaw.html

Thanks!  yeah, it's 800, so I feel like I'm getting a steal.  

Thanks Pwk5017.  I appreciate the info and the nudge to buy, a lot.  

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Single phase?   I don't remember the last one I've seen with a motor cover.  My daily user is about the same, but probably older.  I don't pay much attention to tool birthdates. Since this picture was taken, I've quit dragging that cast iron router wing around with this saw, and put the original smaller wing back on it.planerboot 003 (800x600).jpg

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First ensure it is a single phase 60hz motor.  Replacing to a single phase will about double the cost. 

Don't assume the table is still  flat . Check it with a trusted straight edge.   Many cast tops are not flat. 

Turn the motor on.  It should spool up fast and run at a constant speed.  Leave it running for a while. 

Fully raise and full lower the blade in varying degrees of tilt.  Also tilt zero to 45 stops and back again few times.  It should be smooth with no clunking. 

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56 minutes ago, Pwk5017 said:

What fence is that? It's not OEM. Not much to say about the 1995 unisaw other than its pretty much the same saw(minus the motor) that delta made from 1940-2005ish? Workhorse light industry machine. 3hp single phase? If it's under $900, I'd say that's a no brainer purchase. 

Apparently it's an "accusquare".  I had NEVER seen it either.  Here's their website: http://www.mulecab.com/tablesaw.html

Thanks!  yeah, it's 800, so I feel like I'm getting a steal.  

Thanks Pwk5017.  I appreciate the info and the nudge to buy, a lot.  

18 minutes ago, Brendon_t said:

First ensure it is a single phase 60hz motor.  Replacing to a single phase will about double the cost. 

Don't assume the table is still  flat . Check it with a trusted straight edge.   Many cast tops are not flat. 

Turn the motor on.  It should spool up fast and run at a constant speed.  Leave it running for a while. 

Fully raise and full lower the blade in varying degrees of tilt.  Also tilt zero to 45 stops and back again few times.  It should be smooth with no clunking. 

Thanks Brendon!  I had no idea about the 60hz motor issue.  Your input is SUPER helpful.  Thanks for taking the time to help a rookie.

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Belts are cheap to replace. I think a matched set of three from plaza machinery is $11? I'd ask the owner if he ever replaced the arbor and motor bearing. I think you can usually expect 15-20 years of life out of a quality bearing, which means the 1995 saw is either coming due, or he did it already and you are good for another decade plus. It's pretty easy to swap bearings, but you made it seem like you wanted nothing to do with machine work. Personally, I would factor in replacing the belts and bearings with the purchase price. Worn belts will lead to vibration, and shot bearings can ruin an arbor shaft. These are easier to do when you have the saw apart and moving it compared to when you have it in place with dust collection, out feed table etc. table saw's often get entrenched, so I would suggest doing everything the right way before moving it to its final home. We are talking about $40-50 in parts for what I just prescribed. 

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Holy mackerel guys... Thank you SO much Pwk5017, wdwerker and Brendon_t.  This is exactly what I was hoping a forum would be able to provide... support and mentorship for a guy in the boonies just getting back to handwork after a REALLY long time off (stopped building around 99 and just getting back in, although without it being my profession)  

These are super helpful, and although I'm not skilled with motors yet, I'll be thrilled to learn and will take your advice with replacing the belts and bearing.  if I see signs of wear and if the bearing hasn't been replaced.  My guess is is hasn't.  The saw was donated to a vocational school in Maine from a fabrication shop.  The school only uses sawstop technology for the safety factor, and hence I'm getting the deal of the century from craigslist.

Expect a post on Tuesday night.  I'll give you guys the low down on the saw, and hopefully a pic from my slowly building home shop.  

Again, thanks a ton.  

 

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Soo.. being that it came from an industrial shop, I would be darn sure to check it out from all angles.  Shops can be hard on tools.  A unisaw is up to the challenge as long as it is maintained. I would also wonder why a business gave away a machine. 

Changing bearings ain't no thing.  It's a fairly simple operation with common tools most will have,  a bearing puller can be rented for free from auto zone. If nothing else, it will get you familiar with the saw and setup

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I am no mechanic. Brendon kind of is, i think. Well, the guy has snap-on tools, and I have a 1950s set of craftsman wrenches from my grandpap's estate. Taking the unisaw apart is easy peasy. There is a video that delta produced with some old guy yanking the saw apart and replacing the arbor bearing. If it were me, i would take $500 to that school and tell them it's an industrial setting saw and they should be glad to have $500 to get it off their hands. I would then take it home, disassemble the thing following delta's youtube video. Take the arbor to a machine shop/mechanic to pull the bearing and put on a new one. Same for the motor bearing. Then, order your 3 belts from Joe at plaza machinery and assemble the whole thing for a top notch saw. It is such a pain in the ass to pull the bearing from the arbor with a cheapo pulley/bearing puller from pep boys. They will rent it for free, but it sucks so bad to use. I did 3 unisaws last year, and that bearing puller and i dont ended with bad blood in the pep boy's parking lot. Spend the $10-20 at a shop for them to do the work for you. They do it right, and you wont break a sweat. This is coming from a guy that changes air filters, oil, and thats about it on his car. 

 

Please triple check it is single phase before you give them money. Ive only seen a handful of single phase unisaws in commercial shops and each time i saw the PH: 1, there was a look of surprise on my face. It is much much more common to have 5hp 3 phase saws in a commercial shop and not 3hp single phase. 

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Hey guys, So I'm going to be cleaning up the saw and changing the belts this weekend.  After consulting with Brendon_t I realized I have to run the saw with 220volts.  I'm renting. :(  

I think I have a good chance of my landlord saying yes to me hiring an electrician to wire the garage for 220.  He already knows we're interested in buying the place at some point and he's very reasonable.  That said, in my google search for alternatives, wondering if there was a converter that would save me the hassle of a wiring job, I found this:  

http://www.220-electronics.com/5000-watt-diamond-series-voltage-converter.html?gclid=CjwKEAjwltC9BRDRvMfD2N66nlISJACq8591dnBR1pTyRN0NhUYnqC6O-Vf-MwTuW4QI3rwrwSLKqxoC_Inw_wcB

Have any of you heard of anyone using something like this?  Am I crazy to think it might work?  

 

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I may be wrong but it looks like you would need a 110v outlet with a 45 amp breaker. Which doesn't exist that I know of.

It probably violates all sorts of codes but I have seen people wire 2 -12 gauge 110 v male cords into a junction box and a 220 v  female cord coming out the other side. The plugs would need to be plugged into 2 separate circuits and you wouldn't want anything running on either circut besides the saw.

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Where is the shop located? I know it's not optimum but I have seen 220 drops in a garage for a washer. IF and only if the amperage capability is acceptable, you could buy proper wire and fittings at a wire house or HD if you need and build a 220 extension cord that reaches to that plug. That may provide you an option to run the saw for a year or two until you buy a place. 

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I may be wrong but it looks like you would need a 110v outlet with a 45 amp breaker. Which doesn't exist that I know of.

It probably violates all sorts of codes but I have seen people wire 2 -12 gauge 110 v male cords into a junction box and a 220 v  female cord coming out the other side. The plugs would need to be plugged into 2 separate circuits and you wouldn't want anything running on either circut besides the saw.

And the two circuits need to be from breakers on opposite busses in the breaker panel. That is normally two breakers that are side by side, like a two pole 220 breaker would appear to be.

And it is still not a great idea. So many ways it could kill you...

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The masons on our jobs used to keep their mixer hooked up to a cable wired into a 220 breaker. On new houses they would snap in the breaker and be off. On remodels, they would find an un-necessary couple of spots (garage lights etc.) and pop them out to install their breaker while they worked. It won't meet code. It can be clamped in and safer than some other options. 

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