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Mick S

3D topo map of northern NM - Student project

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One of my CNC students finished this 22" x 19" 3D topographical map of northern NM today. Runtime was 13 hours. 

If you zoom into the upper right corner of the project, there's a caldera featured in the Jemez mountains. For any Longmire fans out there,  his cabin (for filming) sits on the large flat area of the caldera.

IMG_3606.thumb.jpg.e5cb168129a477cbebe4331e9c1a5db8.jpg

 

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Was converting a 3D satellite file to a tool path tricky ? Or did he work off of a plastic 3D model & scan that ? I'm guessing your classroom has multiple machines ? If it's left to run all night would the machine notice if that thin bit broke ?

Wouldn't a cabin on a caldera floor be easy to shoot at from every direction ? I wonder if a storm could flood the cabin ? Or are these things not something that pops into everyone's mind ?

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1 hour ago, wdwerker said:

Was converting a 3D satellite file to a tool path tricky ? Or did he work off of a plastic 3D model & scan that ? I'm guessing your classroom has multiple machines ? If it's left to run all night would the machine notice if that thin bit broke ?

Wouldn't a cabin on a caldera floor be easy to shoot at from every direction ? I wonder if a storm could flood the cabin ? Or are these things not something that pops into everyone's mind ?

3D Terrain to STL converter - Converts a defined Latitude and Longitude into a 3D STL file, that most CNC software can toolpath.

On the machines I've used, if the bit breaks, it keeps going. Just doesn't cut anything obviously...

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On 4/20/2018 at 8:48 AM, wdwerker said:

Was converting a 3D satellite file to a tool path tricky ? Or did he work off of a plastic 3D model & scan that ? I'm guessing your classroom has multiple machines ? If it's left to run all night would the machine notice if that thin bit broke ?

Wouldn't a cabin on a caldera floor be easy to shoot at from every direction ? I wonder if a storm could flood the cabin ? Or are these things not something that pops into everyone's mind ?

If it isn't already a lake there is probably a way for water to get out. That and there isn't much area contributing to the caldera so if an inch falls over the whole thing in theory the calera would only have water 1" deep.

That's really cool 3D terrain models is one thing that i' love to get from a CNC. There are a few cool areas that i'd love to see carved out. I'd probably put some vertical exaggeration in it to make the elevations really pop though.

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Steve, the caldera gets a good bit of snowfall every year - this one being an exception. I've never heard of any flooding issues up there. There are plenty of streams and other outlets for the water to drain off. The caldera is about 14 miles in diameter and sits at about 11,000 feet. Walt Longmire being no mere mortal sheriff, he could hear a prairie dog popping up from two miles away.

Drew, years ago we did a topo of the Grand Canyon in urethane foam (cutting about 5 x faster than wood with excellent detail) that was almost 4 x 8. Still took a long time but was very impressive. One of the issues you run into with exaggerating the elevations is the tool length. We did the finish pass on the one in the photo with a 1/8" bit and came so close to bottoming it out in a few places.

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