Carving out some time (ha ha)...


Eric.

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Annoying I can handle...remember Jim Carrey's most annoying sound in the world from Dumb and Dumber? That was annoying. But it was funny, too. That Sheldon dude just ain't funny. IMO, of course.

Pills are good!

I was just talking at work how I wanted that as my ring tone.
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  • 8 months later...

Eric, since we went multiple directions on this thread, I figure any things game and not hijack. I will start the contemplation bench shortly since the current guild project is not my cup of tea. I looked at your journal and see that you used a plane with a curve to it. What is that called and did it help?

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It's a convex sole block plane.

 

https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/convex-sole-block-plane

 

Did it help?  Honestly, not really.  It's quite small and the curve is kind of too severe for the gentle curve you're shaping in the bench seat.  The ideal tool would have been a round spokeshave, but I only had a flat one at the time.  Most of the shaping was done with the Arbortech, and I used a regular block plane, rasps and sanders to finish it off.  I do have a round spokeshave now, and that would be the tool I'd recommend.

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Wow, I've never even heard of lacewood - it's beautiful.  I really like how the ray fleck pattern is more dense and uniform than QSWO - it's a cool contrast in that it gives kind of an "orderly" appearance to a piece whose design feels more "improv".  Nice job.  

 

I don't like staining either...but when you have to, GF dye stain is so easy and nice to work with.   

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Just like with QSWO, the fleck in lacewood will vary from board to board, and will be more intense and uniform the more perfectly quarter-sawn the board is.  The fleck tends to be more "circular" than "linear," for lack of better terms...which gives it a more uniform look, generally.  The board I built the bench out of just happened to close to perfect from end to end.

 

Thanks again!  It was a fun build and pretty fast and easy, too.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The last trip to Louisiana, we cut down a cherry tree that had been dead for 6-7 years but was still standing. I took it to a local mill along with the walnut tree. I had a center section of one cherry log cut to 8/4, just for the bench. Unfortunately, it's full of ant/bug tunnels so it won't be a show piece. I've just been intrigued by the bench since Marc built it. Maybe a bunch of West Systems is in order?

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I had a big knot on the inside of one of the rails of the bed I just finished, and I filled it with WS epoxy.  It's a pretty good match on cherry.  It's plasticy and ugly, and I'm not sure I'd want it on the show face of anything, but it does about as good a job as you could hope for as a filler on cherry.

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I have an inexpensive rasp from Rockler. I've looked back on other post and see that a few of you favor the Auriou and some the Liogier. On one post, someone had purchased hand cut rasp form Lee Valley. I checked on the LV and they don't indicate the coarseness (for lack of a better word). If I were to get one LV for this project, which would you suggest?

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Coarseness is defined by "grain" when talking about rasps.  Lower is coarser.  They go from #3...The HOG, which will remove material like a chainsaw, up to like #15 or something in the modeler's rasps.  I think they recommend starting with a 10" 9 grain or something in that ballpark.  It's coarse enough to remove material quickly without leaving super-deep scratches.  That's where I started...and I was addicted immediately.  Think I have almost a dozen Auriou rasps and rifflers now.  I love using them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Coarseness is defined by "grain" when talking about rasps.  Lower is coarser.  They go from #3...The HOG, which will remove material like a chainsaw, up to like #15 or something in the modeler's rasps.  I think they recommend starting with a 10" 9 grain or something in that ballpark.  It's coarse enough to remove material quickly without leaving super-deep scratches.  That's where I started...and I was addicted immediately.  Think I have almost a dozen Auriou rasps and rifflers now.  I love using them.

 

Eric do you mind running down a quick inventory of which rasps/rifflers you  have and which you use the most?  I bought a 9 grain auriou rasp when I was making a desk with cabriole legs, and I absolutely fell in love with it.  Not sure where I would go from here though.  I'd like to get involved with the maloof rocker guild build and am starting to re-build my tool wish list after Christmas buying season.   :D

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Coarseness is defined by "grain" when talking about rasps.  Lower is coarser.  They go from #3...The HOG, which will remove material like a chainsaw, up to like #15 or something in the modeler's rasps.  I think they recommend starting with a 10" 9 grain or something in that ballpark.  It's coarse enough to remove material quickly without leaving super-deep scratches.  That's where I started...and I was addicted immediately.  Think I have almost a dozen Auriou rasps and rifflers now.  I love using them.

So, having the assortment that you have, would YOU recommend the 10" 9 grain as a starter?

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  • 7 years later...
On 12/8/2014 at 7:51 PM, Coop said:

Thanks Bud. I bought a comparable wheel from Saburrtooth last month at a show here in Houston. I like your idea using a pattern and router to get the shape and I do have a round spokeshave. Thanks again for your help.

I did a search of the site and did not find many posts on power carving or Saburrtooth power carving bits. I was interested to see if anyone had used them with any success?  I wanted to make some kitchen utensils, nothing too fancy. From what I have found I think I can cut out the general shapes with my bandsaw and then could use something like these bits to get me down to the final shape. 

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I have used these burrs to do simple "carving".  They are effective wood removers.  I've used the cylinder shapes, never the balls or round nose bits.  If you are going to use a Dremel, then I think their flexible shaft accessory is useful to have for this.  I wish the Dremel motors were reversible,  but alas, they are not.

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9 hours ago, Mark J said:

I have used these burrs to do simple "carving".  They are effective wood removers.  I've used the cylinder shapes, never the balls or round nose bits.  If you are going to use a Dremel, then I think their flexible shaft accessory is useful to have for this.  I wish the Dremel motors were reversible,  but alas, they are not.

I will have to try these out!  I looked at their web site and it actually reminded my I have their wood rasps and I use them to round over my tenons and they work great!  If the power carvers work as good as the hand rasp I would imagine these do the trick. 

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