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collinb

How would you do this?

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I've always liked the classic Wharfedale "D" series of the speakers, circa 1970.

They put a nice wood trim around the edges. But, not knowing how to approach recreating such a trim for another speaker, I'm wondering of someone who is practiced with hand carving might outline the sequence needed to do this. (Then, after my arm returns, some practice.)

w70d Trim.jpg

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From the width of the cut it looks like it was done with a milling head. Dont know if they had CNC back then, looks like several step and repeat runs at different angles and starting points.

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I have been taking on line carving course from Mary May.  I think I know how it would be done by hand but am still too much of a beginner to explain the process.  I see some variations from one circle to the next so I think it was hand carved.  It would take about 4 different gouges to do.  I like the design.

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It might be hand carved, or might not. It definitely was laid out with a compass if cut by hand. I'm also pretty sure the bead edge is applied after the carving.

I think Carus is on to something. Use a hole saw in the drill press to mark / cut the overlapping circles, the relieve them with a hand tool. I think careful use if a chip carving knife would work.

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11 hours ago, Ronn W said:

 I see some variations from one circle to the next so I think it was hand carved.  It would take about 4 different gouges to do.  I like the design.

I seriously doubt fully hand carved for a production speaker. I am just not sure how the rough work may have been done in the 70s.  Hand finishing I do not doubt. 

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I think somebody mounted a cutter from a shaper on a drill press and drilled in from an angle to get the profile I see there. Step the piece over one diameter of the cutter and do it again until you cover the length. The marks between look like the same cutter just touching at a half step between the deeper cuts. Overall a fairly simple pattern.

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