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Chet, the panels come in 3/4” and 1” thicknesses. Quality ply is not easily available in Oz, and I have used these panels for jigs as it is cheap and stable. I have used the 1” thick panel as a bench top (on a small additional bench). It certainly could be used for shelving. I know some woodworkers who have doubled it as the top for a full-on workbench.

Regards from Perth

Derek

 

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Derek, I see very little burn from the blade and I understand that jarrah is pretty hard. What blade are you using? I bet it’s also due to the fact that you are not pausing the cut due to the slider? 

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Coop, the saw blade in use is a Stark 305mm (12") combination blade. I also have a dedicated rip and crosscut in Leuco blades. These are not terribly expensive blades ... a little above average in cost.

There should be NO burning. 

The quality of cut could be put down to 40% blade and 60% slider/parallel guide. The slider keeps the work piece from moving. even a little, and the result is as flat as off a jointer. This is a glue line rip, as demonstrated above. Another way to do this, on a conventional cabinet saw, is to use the JessEm guides, which force the workpiece to hug the fence.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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The plate is a Seneca Domiplate: https://www.senecawoodworking.com/products/domiplate-for-1-2-and-3-4-ply

This allows one to bypass the Domino’s fence and set a central cutting position for 12mm/18mm or 1/2”/3/4” thick boards. The advantage is thatbthere can be no errors creeping in from a fence that misaligns. 

Regards from Perth

Derek

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You are right, quite a challenging task and I'm following along with complete confidence in your ability to pull this off. 

Thanks for sharing this build.

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