Johnny4

(Sigh)....Roubo time

Recommended Posts

Hey! I realize this thread is pretty roubo-heavy, but I’m doing it. It has been really helpful to see how others tackle the steps. So, here’s my question for the sons and daughters of sawdust. I am milling the top currently. I had some trial and error in jointing the very long edges, and ended up just ripping the edges clean with a circ saw. I have read (and experienced) board warpage after milling. Do I need to do ALL OF THE MILLING AMD GLUE UP IN THE SAME DAY? Or can I:

day 1: rip to rough lenghts

day 2: rough mill to 4 1/2

day 3 glue up

I am just trying to wrap my head around how sensitive the wood’s gonna be. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually find it best to mill shortly before the glue up.

What you can do is rough mill (a little over size) ahead of time and sticker/stack them and then do another light milling just before glue up.  This way, if anything moves on you, you get it taken care of before the glue up.

Something else I did is to do my glue ups in sub batches that I could get through the planer after the glue up.  This also meant that I had less overall flattening to do after the final glue up.

It's always fun to watch a Roubo build!  They never seem to get old!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's me or the material i get but I've never had issues even with some large timbers milling 1 day and gluing the next or even 3 days later. Most of the wood i'm using has acclimated for 3-6 months and should be pretty stable to my shop. Also taking even ammounts from all sides helps.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you remove a more material from one side than the other you can release tension and expose deeper layers to either gain or loose moisture. That can cause wood to move unevenly. So even (within reason, let's not get too obsessive) removal of material and plenty of acclimation time are a good idea. Buy a moisture meter to track changes. Monitoring the humidity levels in your shop/lumber storage area is not a bad idea either.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monitoring humidity is something that i started doing after i began woodworking. I figured I'm not alone but i have 2 humidity sensors 1 is on my stack of lumber the other is on the other side of the shop. Cutting up wood after large humidity swings in the house or shop can cause problems as well. Luckily the humidity in my shop moves slowly but i'm in a dry basement an external shop with no climate control could have drastic humidity changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice. I’m in a basement that is pretty well humidity controlled, and the lumber is at around 7%. I had a bear of a time trying to use my 6” jointer on these boards. The roller stand tango wasn’t giving me consistent results, and I didn’t want to spend the time trouble shooting when the circ saw would do the job. Any advice on how to joint these? I followed Marc’s videos, but the cutter only seemed to really work in the center section of the board. I did the best I could!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having just finished my roubo I feel some of your pain and I have an 8” jointer.  I quickly discovered that my infeed and outfeed beds were not co-planer and this will really cause frustration on those long pieces, so check to make sure your beds are set properly.  Depending on the amount of twist, cup, crook and bow that are in your pieces you may need to focus on taking partial jointing passes on the worst defects.  This requires a good understanding of the warpage in the board, cup is the easiest to deal with placing the cupped edges on the jointer bed.  Twist, bow and crook may require several partial passes on part of the board.  Use a good straight edge to gain a good understanding of the offending material.  Another option would be to take a hand plane and flatten the best face and edge by hand or at least get it close so you can take complete passes with the jointer.  Several people have also had success with skip planing the pieces with a thickness planer, take very light cuts to both sides of the board until the knives are just making contact across the surface, then take a pass on your jointer.  If you have a bit of bow then this can usually be resolved with clamping pressure and dominos or biscuits can help with slight crook.  Twist is the nasty one that you need to eliminate it!  Winding sticks and hand planing may be your best option here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally getting the top ripped. Took time off to turn 40 and had a few houseguests. I have learned:

1) Stop being afraid to cut up big boards. It will be ok. 

2) roller stands are a love/hate relationship. 

3) Don’t go to the gym before you mill.

I will have all this cut up by the end of the day. Enjoy the “oh so roubo” milling pics. :)

 

74D77E73-4639-4376-A17F-9CCD1DE382E9.jpeg

2E57B179-D467-4F2A-BDA5-0D500B5DA2FB.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's....a lot of milling. Got all the pieces milled down to do the top construction. Everyone is about 4 3/8, except for one bastard....we have plans for him. Now to figure out which boards I want where, and in what orientation to get all the cut offs on one end. Not much to report except watching boards go through the planer.....for 8 hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy hell. Gym before milling is gym x8..

8 hours of milling down, about 13 to go

On 7/12/2018 at 6:21 AM, Chestnut said:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours total on milling, broken up over a couple of days. There was a lot of time spent “figgerin” and some union smoke breaks.

 

Got the boards ripped down. The bandsaw got quite the workout. Tomorrow is more milling. Jointer/planer love fest 2018! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arghhh.....My milling didn't go quite as well as I had hoped. I don't have consistent flat and square. When I clamp the stuff together, it closes up, but it then isn't square. Will this work itself out after glueing, flattening, etc...or do I need to really make sure the top stock is flat and square now?

I'm sorry if it's an obvious question, I haven't built anything quite this large before.

Thanks,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Johnny4 said:

Arghhh.....My milling didn't go quite as well as I had hoped. I don't have consistent flat and square. When I clamp the stuff together, it closes up, but it then isn't square. Will this work itself out after glueing, flattening, etc...or do I need to really make sure the top stock is flat and square now?

I'm sorry if it's an obvious question, I haven't built anything quite this large before.

Thanks,

John

The short answer is yes. You will have to deal with it at some point I would get it corrected now. being a consistent thickness for the boards is the key now since the top will have to be flattened once glued up anyway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well....I had to call in "the ringer." My woodworking buddy in town is a North Bennet Street grad, and he's coming in for a "workbench consultation" Sunday to see if he can help me get straightened out (haha). 

I will keep y'all posted.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Johnny4 said:

Well....I had to call in "the ringer." My woodworking buddy in town is a North Bennet Street grad, and he's coming in for a "workbench consultation" Sunday to see if he can help me get straightened out (haha). 

I will keep y'all posted.

 

Well that's nice to have in your corner :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, pkinneb said:

The short answer is yes. You will have to deal with it at some point I would get it corrected now. being a consistent thickness for the boards is the key now since the top will have to be flattened once glued up anyway

If I'm reading this right, you are laminating the top and with adequate clamping pressure you can get a monolith. As I understand the concern you're running into is although the slab is now together the top and bottom of each board are not 90 degrees creating a ridge on one side and V on the other is that correct? if that is your major issue here, it's not an issue. Once you glue it up and throw it through the planer you will take off the high on the top and bottom leaving you with two flat and hopefully coplanar surfaces.

this is definitely something that should be checked on your jointer as well as full Milling schedule but I don't think it's something you need to worry about right now doing the glue up. In fact I think you will lose more with of the top attempting to go back and renal everything Square then you would gluing up as is and then planning the top and bottom as you were already intending.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks fellas....let me see what the ringer has to say, and I will get back to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are good to go. The ringer is helping me glue up Saturday. 

 

8 hours total on milling, broken up over a couple of days. There was a lot of time spent “figgerin” and some union smoke breaks.

 

Got the boards ripped down. The bandsaw got quite the workout. Tomorrow is more milling. Jointer/planer love fest 2018! 

BDB557E4-3930-4875-98C0-66ABB74C7332.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glued up the back slab. Has anyone had experience doing the initial flattening with a router sled? I made one recently for a slab table, and thought it would be a good way to go. Thoughts?

My wife is out of town for 5 days, and I can usurp her sacred ground that I am not allowed to keep crap in. If she reads this one day, “I’m so sorry honey. There really wasn’t another choice. And I want to buy you something.”

Tomorrow we glue the front slab and work on flattening.

FE606180-CB5C-4C71-94F1-B694DC96ADD9.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, MattF said:

What she doesn’t know, won’t hurt you.

Famous last words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/26/2018 at 11:55 AM, pkinneb said:
21 hours ago, Johnny4 said:

Glued up the back slab. Has anyone had experience doing the initial flattening with a router sled? I made one recently for a slab table, and thought it would be a good way to go. Thoughts?

 

If you've got a sled, registration surface long enough and the desire, let it rip.  I would attempt to take off as little as possible starting on the underside first.  Once your face is flat enough to register true against the planer bed, take it there. You want to avoid talking off too much material now. In the end, the top needs to be the ringer. If your bottom slab isn't perfect between legs, that's ok. If you have plenty of thickness, once you are coplaner, then remove too desired thickness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now