Chip Sawdust

Just bought a little lathe...

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I'd like to hear what you think of it. Can always turn tool handles and non furniture related stuff like pens and cheese knives, bowls ect. Well maybe not so many bowls on that small guy.

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1x8 is pretty easy to find adapters and attachments for. I’ve got the Nova G3 chuck set and it has worked out well for all I do. 

That lathe can do 12” diameter so you can do a good bit with it. No big salad bowls, but I’ve been able to turn a lot of bowls on my 10”x14” midi. 

Avoid the harbor freight MT2 drill chuck. I bought one and it had a ton of runout. Threw it away and bought the Woodriver one and it has been good. 

Which gouges did you get?

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5 hours ago, Chip Sawdust said:

I was t gonna get a lathe, wasn’t gonna, wasn’t gonna....

Welcome to "The Hotel".

It's a nice little lathe, and there's a lot you're going to be able to do with it.

There are a lot of chuck choices out there, but Nova is a good brand and one of the most commonly available.  It's the brand you're going to find when you go to a Woodcraft or Rockler.  The Nova G3 would be a good size for your lathe.  Make sure you get the proper insert to fit the lathe spindle and, if you can, more than one set of jaws.

 

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From what I understand, the initial purchase of a lathe is only the beginning. Profess, I am a lathe owner and I admit it :ph34r:

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I have a Rikon 70-050VS. Love it! It has been replaced with another model. Buy a Rikon slow speed grinder if you can. Got one of those, too. Sorry to hear that the WC store is closing. Had a local WC close. That was about the time the economy dipped. I have only gone in there twice and not bought anything. FWIW, my wife goes to Ollie's in the shopping center. She came by later, picked out a bunch of pen kits and blanks that were on sale. Ia that great or what? Almost 47 years!

Edit- I have a Supernova2 chuck, 1-8, Cole jaws and pen jaws. Good for the $$$. Looked at some of the others and choked when I saw the price tag!

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Just now, Bankstick said:

I have a Rikon 70-050VS. Love it! It has been replaced with another model. Buy a Rikon slow speed grinder if you can. Got one of those, too. Sorry to hear that the WC store is closing. Had a local WC close. That was about the time the economy dipped. I have only gone in there twice and not bought anything. FWIW, my wife goes to Ollie's in the shopping center. She came by later, picked out a bunch of pen kits and blanks that were on sale. Ia that great or what? Almost 47 years!

Sounds like you found the right woman! 

I have hot hat exact grinder for quite a while in 8”. Has a grinding wheel on one end right now and a buffing wheel on the other side. I used that for polishing ebony bits for my G&G work. I like it, and got it on sale so bonus! 

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Also have Richard Raffan’s book Turning Wood which should be here soon. In this age of online videos I’m hoping to have less of a learning curve.

So far it’s been quite satisfying and I don’t know a darned thing! 

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See if there is a chapter of American Association of Woodturners close. Worth the membership and lots of demonstrations on various styles and types of turning. Went to one that was about sharpening only.

It is www.woodturner.org.

Remember- One good turn deserves another.

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Haha, one good turn :) 

there is a woodturner’s group around here; they used to meet at Woodcraft - apparently I’ll need to see how that shakes out when it’s all said and done. They may end up meeting at the local AFB as I’ve seen pictures on their site of that shop. I’d need a drool cup to go there, but... :) 

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I just cleared up some space in my shop that oddly enough is the perfect size for a lathe.......

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

I just cleared up some space in my shop that oddly enough is the perfect size for a lathe.......

Uh oh! I hear it’s a dark hole....

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5 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I just cleared up some space in my shop that oddly enough is the perfect size for a lathe.......

Gonna need room for all that goes with it too!  Sharpening system, tool rack, a way to contain the shavings without burying the lathe. Then you need a few shelves to dry the roughed out bowls. After that you will need space to display your work in the house, your wife will need more room to store the bracelets and pens you will make her. List goes on and on.

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I echo the advice about joining a turning club, even before they find a new home.  Rafan is a well respected resource, but there's also much to be said for a hands on demonstration even if it's just from another ameture.  

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BTW,  the AAW website has videos that I believe are available to anyone. IMHO, the membership for AAW is worth its weight in wood. I have learned a lot from their magazine, the local  members and the demonstrations we have had. One memorable demo was making a two piece hollow form. Turn two pieces that match as closely as possible. One will have a small opening for the top section. The "seam" is virtually invisible when done. Google it and you might find an example. If the budget allows, take a lesson or two. Don't see where you live but there might be a craft school school nearby. Caution- Youtube videos might not show the safest methods. AAW videos are reviewed for safety. Some will have a disclaimer as methods might need some modification to show how to apply a gouge, skew, etc.

Remember- One good turn deserves another!

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Ha, you guys are awesome, thanks! I did order the Nova G3 chuck and one set of jaws. The bed extension was cheapest from an outfit called Tomboy, never heard of them but lowest price I found and free shipping for a factory bed extension. Should have it all together by midweek. 

In Spokane, WA and there is a turning guild/club here so I’ll be hunting them down. Found some à richard Raffan vidéos and bought one of his books, so should have a little more under my hat soon. 

Im trying to figure te best way to put spiral flutes on a column, lots of techniques out there. It’s not simple but the coolest stuff rarely is... anyone have experience with that? 

Im also going to do stringing, maybe banding, on some turnings. Sort of combine my Federal furniture techniques. Some Hepplewhite and Sheraton furniture had those things combined, but you don’t see too many in plans and designs these days. 

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I don't know how to do spiral flutes on a lathe (unless we're talking about a rose engine/ornamental lathe), but someone in that club may know some resources.  

A year ago I bought one of those Craftsman spiral router contraptions at a garage sale, but I haven't done anything with it.  

Banding is a popular embellishment, frequently with brass wire.  I've seen it demonstrated at our club meeting and it's on "my list".

Definetly go to the club meetings, but also join AAW so you can participate in their forum, too.

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Thanks Mark it’s on my list to join those AAW folks for sure. 

Meanwhile today I put a small green stump on the lathe to see what I could do with it. Made a LOT of shavings, not sure how much progress. At any rate, green wood and a possible bowl will take, as I understand it, a year or more to complete. It’s an experiment....

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Once I get the lathe bed extension I’ll be building a more permanent spot for the whole thing. Right now it’s next to my mortiser as that’s the only free bench space I had when I brought it home. It works, but for sure with a 24” extension it won’t work no mo’ :) 

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Hey @Chip Sawdust,

A couple of thoughts I want to put out there for you on your stump.  You mentioned that you are looking at making a bowl, but I wanted to point out that the log is on the lathe in what is generally considered spindle orientation rather than bowl orientation.  You're not breaking any laws here, but typically for a bowl the grain direction is perpendicular to the axis of rotation.  For spindle work such as candle holder or pepper mill the grain runs parallel to the bed of the lathe.  The end grain is much more difficult to cut than the long grain and it is also more difficult to finish smooth.  That said if you were making a pepper mill you would hollow out the end grain, so nothing is stopping you from making a bowl in this orientation, but you will probably find it easier to do with the grain running the other way.  

Of a little more concern to me is that your blank includes the pith.  Just like with flat work the pith is undesirable.  As the wood dries there is differential shrinkage such that the pith will send a crack radially through the log.  If you succeed in completing a turned piece it will likely not survive drying.  But be aware that the log is drying as we speak, particularly as you remove more and more material so there is a real danger that it will crack while spinning on the lathe resulting in what I like to call an "event of great badness".  

Let me get this message out there.

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You could still turn this log.  What I would do is cut it lengthwise to divide it 40-20-40 to get rid of the pith.  If you don't have a carrier to cut the log round side down you may be able to cut it on the bandsaw standing on its end.  Then lay the pieces down on their flat side and rough out a circle.  You can make the inside of the bowl on either side.  There is going to be some ghost turning involved here, so remember you need some speed on the lathe, while you proceed very slowly with the tool.   Remember there is no roll for a spindle roughing gouge in bowl orientation work.  

Save those great shavings you're making.  They are great to pack the piece in when you're in between turning sessions or when final drying.  

 

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Thanks guys I truly appreciate the input. It’s all a bit of an experiment, and while the grain is running wrong (I knew that but had ideas about it), it’s never going to see the light of day inside the house. 

I sure don’t want to see that big thing crack and cause “great badness” though! 

I eventually got bored with it today and had other things to work on. I was astonished at the pile of shavings and how fast that stacked up!

does anyone wax their tool rests, or go so far as to file them, send them really smooth and then wax them? I’ve heard other methods. Today I put some table saw wax on the rest, buffed the backside of my gouge and waxed it too. It had some sap on it and I found it not moving smoothly along the rest. That was my big fear today with the heavy piece, that I’d get a catch and incur physical pain somehow :( 

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