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Coyote Jim

Fairly simple monitor riser.

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Little different design then you normally see I was expecting something just under the monitor. 

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40 minutes ago, Chet said:

Little different design then you normally see I was expecting something just under the monitor. 

Not sure if you are saying that as a pro or a con.

Three reasons for this though.

1. I need a second monitor so wanted the platform to be big enough to handle that.

2. What you don't see in any of these pictures is how incredibly messy my desk usually is. I wanted this thing to be big enough so I can slide papers, keyboard, mouse and other stuff under it to hide the mess when I need to.

3. I don't like doing things they way they are "normally" done. I'm a contrarian by nature. I don't even do it on purpose. I'm just naturally difficult. (Read: PITA)

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Nice work! Color and finish look great. Next time you need to cut a hole through a finished piece, painter's tape will be your friend. Be liberal.

Also, a suggestion to try on another oak project. Chemical coloration can produce stunning effects, the like of which, if done with stain, might obscure even red oak grain. Try a mild acid like vinegar to weather it (usually lighter color), iron acetate to 'ebonize' it, or mild basic solution (lye) to darken it. I posted a pic somewhere, showing how lye turned red oak a lovely cola / caramel brown. The joy (and heartache) of chemical coloration is that it's like a box of chocolates - variations in the wood itself mean you never know (exactly) what you're going to get. But the result is usually good.

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Nice job!

But your boss called and wants 3 dozen more units. 

By Friday.  :huh:

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39 minutes ago, Coyote Jim said:

 

Well....um....you see....I'm my own boss. But....if I don't deliver the 3 dozen units by Friday I suppose that would give me grounds to fire myself!! That would be awesome. I would have way more shop time!

And less income.

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On 6/26/2019 at 7:01 PM, wtnhighlander said:

Nice work! Color and finish look great. Next time you need to cut a hole through a finished piece, painter's tape will be your friend. Be liberal.

Also, a suggestion to try on another oak project. Chemical coloration can produce stunning effects, the like of which, if done with stain, might obscure even red oak grain. Try a mild acid like vinegar to weather it (usually lighter color), iron acetate to 'ebonize' it, or mild basic solution (lye) to darken it. I posted a pic somewhere, showing how lye turned red oak a lovely cola / caramel brown. The joy (and heartache) of chemical coloration is that it's like a box of chocolates - variations in the wood itself mean you never know (exactly) what you're going to get. But the result is usually good.

Ross, this chemical thing, does it need to be done after final sanding or does it go deep enough that final sanding won’t effect it? 

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Coop, in my experience, a single application goes about as deep as the dyes I've used. But if water is the solvent, some grain raising takes place.

For the cherry bar top, I applied the solution after 120 grit, bringing out color and raising the grain before the 180 grit pass. I repeated between 180-220, and again between 220-320. That left me with a deep, even color that did not appear affected by the 320 sanding. I started applying poly from there.

After reading many posts about lye as a coloring agent, I learned that some folks wash the surface with a weak vinegar & water solution to neutralize any unactivated lye. Some say that is necessary when using shellac, as the lye can react with it, but not with poly. I can say the examples I saw of cherry with lye color and vinegar wash took a slightly pale green cast, not the near candy apple red I got.

I did have some hazing on the top side of the bartop, but not the underside. My theory is that was caused by moisture - I was working in an uncontrolled environment, and a weather front brought loads of humidity after I put poly on the underside, but before the top side.

Also, look for a pure lye product. Drano brand has too much other gunk in it.

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