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Waldvogel Review

Woodpeckers T-square ?

21 posts in this topic

Is anybody using these? I know some of you must. I REALLY want this for a couple reasons.

1-Precision ! I mean, they look beautiful and they are aligned so well, why wouldnt i want to make this type of investment.

2-I light the ability to store it safely on the wall. I wish there was this option for more precision tools like my other squares.

I currently have a t-square off amazon and the rivets that hold the 2 pieces of aluminum together are getting loose. Not even 6 months later. I mostly use this for tuning in my table saw fence. But I wouldnt mind just kicking it up a notch.

Let me know what you love and what you hate about them.

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I think a lot of people have them.  The build is superb. Storage is really nice although it is a bunch of real estate on a wall if your walls are full. I wouldn't hesitate to buy one again. 

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Not sure they are worth the price but I have the 12" and the 24" and they are dead accurate. I use them a fair amount.

IMG_0743.JPG

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If you get the red ones, it won't be long you'll be looking for the green ones!

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I love my Woodpeckers framing square. I've got several other layout tools by them. Haven't seen the need for a Tee square yet.

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I have the 32". I thought I would use it every day, but it's turned out to be only used on occasion, so it was kinda expensive. I mostly just use it when I need to perfectly do layout lines and I already have a good straight board edge to reference off of. It's not as much help for creating that reference edge like I'd hoped.

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I have the 24" and have only used it a couple times. Its a great quality, design and tool, but its just not the way I mark boards if that makes any sense.

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I use mine quite a bit..

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Don't have a T-Square, but I have the 8", 12" and I am currently awaiting arrival of the 24" squares.  I've never been disappointed by the red. If you find that having a T-square is essential to your work flow, then I say go for it, you won't be disappointed.

18 hours ago, pkinneb said:

Not sure they are worth the price but I have the 12" and the 24" and they are dead accurate. I use them a fair amount.

IMG_0743.JPG

Nice setup. I'm lazy and just bought the MDF cases. The straight edge was bought on a whim, because it was cheap. I don't think I've ever used it.  I might have a problem.

IMG_1520.JPG

 

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I have the 24" and love it. Its a great tool and you will surely reach for it often enough if you have it in your shop. You cannot go wrong with woodpeckers quality.

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7 hours ago, Dknapp34 said:

"The straight edge was bought on a whim, because it was cheap. I don't think I've ever used it."

I use the straight edge for the "0" center quite often.

 

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I'm looking at the T square 24" would allow me to calibrate my table saw

And I definitely want the straight edge too

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6 hours ago, Waldvogel Review said:

I'm looking at the T square 24" would allow me to calibrate my table saw

And I definitely want the straight edge too

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Get the t-squre if you want a quality t-square but, a straight edge and an inexpensive dial caliper will go further in your alignment tasks.  My point is that if alignment is your focus I would put my money toward a better straight edge if I had to choose.

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I have the Incra 18" t-square and I use it pretty often. I have it attached to my workbench:

2015-09-13_11.25.17.thumb.jpg.d1facec94eb33c2a0e7b17543e0c975c.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, gee-dub said:

Get the t-squre if you want a quality t-square but, a straight edge and an inexpensive dial caliper will go further in your alignment tasks.  My point is that if alignment is your focus I would put my money toward a better straight edge if I had to choose.

Im building a table saw station that will house my Dewalt 7480 with a Delta T-square fence. when used in the table. The precision i need most is the aligning my blade to the fence. I can see a precision straight edge for aligning the top, but my largest concern is making sure the fence is square to the blade at all points on my custom table first and foremost. For that, I would prefer to use a nice t-square to reference off of for all the 90 degree measurements

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$10 HF dial caliper and some scrap.

TS Alignment Tool (1).jpg

TS Alignment Tool (5).jpg22124 Alingment 004.jpg22124 Alingment 005.jpg22124 Alingment 010.jpg

Don't get me wrong.  I am not one of those "close enough" guys.  If my blade is not .001" to the miter slot on the same tooth between the leading and trailing positions, I keep working at it.  Once you have that, do the same at 45 degrees and then go back and fix 90 degrees if required; rinse and repeat.

I also find these to be a big help during setup or re-alignment after moving a machine.  It is surprising how much easier it is to use these than the short ones.  When your not in the moment, the difference seems . . . meh.  When you are on one knee, holding a feeler gauge in one hand and a socket in the other, the difference is huge :D

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$10 HF dial caliper and some scrap.

TS Alignment Tool (1).jpg

TS Alignment Tool (5).jpg22124 Alingment 004.jpg22124 Alingment 005.jpg22124 Alingment 010.jpg

Don't get me wrong.  I am not one of those "close enough" guys.  If my blade is not .001" to the miter slot on the same tooth between the leading and trailing positions, I keep working at it.  Once you have that, do the same at 45 degrees and then go back and fix 90 degrees if required; rinse and repeat.

I also find these to be a big help during setup or re-alignment after moving a machine.  It is surprising how much easier it is to use these than the short ones.  When your not in the moment, the difference seems . . . meh.  When you are on one knee, holding a feeler gauge in one hand and a socket in the other, the difference is huge

You sir, are a man aftet my own heart. Those dial indicators are definitely one of HF's "hidden gems". Useful for so many things!

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18 hours ago, gee-dub said:

$10 HF dial caliper and some scrap.

TS Alignment Tool (1).jpg

TS Alignment Tool (5).jpg22124 Alingment 004.jpg22124 Alingment 005.jpg22124 Alingment 010.jpg

Don't get me wrong.  I am not one of those "close enough" guys.  If my blade is not .001" to the miter slot on the same tooth between the leading and trailing positions, I keep working at it.  Once you have that, do the same at 45 degrees and then go back and fix 90 degrees if required; rinse and repeat.

I also find these to be a big help during setup or re-alignment after moving a machine.  It is surprising how much easier it is to use these than the short ones.  When your not in the moment, the difference seems . . . meh.  When you are on one knee, holding a feeler gauge in one hand and a socket in the other, the difference is huge :D

I dont fully understand how you line your fence up to the blade across its length with something like that It can be pretty square at <5 inches or so, but out at 30 inches, you have to check as well when you first set these things up. I have a nice calibration blade blank and think i can mostly get it using some 1,2,3 blocks

 

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You align the blade to the miter slot.  Then you align the fence to the SAME miter slot.  The little jig slides in the miter slot and shows you the relation of your fence to the slot.  With the dial indicator you are just checking for the "difference".  You don't care that something is .011" away; you just care that you start at .011" and don't see a difference of more than .001" between the points you are checking.

Most fences have a pretty decent alignment method or at least loosen for alignment and then can be re-tightened.  Most dial indicators have a rotating bezel that allows you to put the "zero" wherever you want to start.

Once you are pretty true to the miter slot (and therefor the blade) you can check the deviation of your fence faces over the length of the slot.  My Saw Stop faces were wavy to .005" along the length.  It was easy to shim the "low" spots with tape between the fence tube and face to get to .001" along the length.

Say goodbye to saw marks, binding and burning due to alignment problems.

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