duckkisser

jigs for the shop

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so I have getting by without some dedicated jigs for the shop.  I decided to build some sleds and guides for the shop starting with my table saw.  im going to use fishers videos as my bases for the jigs im going to build. Does anyone have any recommendations for other jigs I should build? not just for table saw but for router table, bandsaw ect...or some better jigs then the ones in the videos?

 

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I recommend looking ahead at the upcoming tasks you need to accomplish, and base your jig selection on necessity. Multi-use items like a tablesaw sled, often benefit from task evaluation to determine the most-used features.

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problem is im not a wood worker who makes similar projects.  one week im making a desk and another week im making some bandsaw boxes.  depends on what my interest is in that week. I need to make some picture frames for some painting that I made that's why I want to make a miter sled attachment for my table saw sled. but I make a lot of inlays so I want to have a thin cut guide.  

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I’ve said it so often that I’m sure others wish I would shut up but as you’ve been gone awhile, I’m sure they will understand. And funny you say picture frame/miter sled. I copied one that Kev posted and even I can make 90* corners. Hit him up for the link (again). And then if you like, give me credit for it. ;)

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was just trying to find this topic

I like the built in stops but I don't like that fact that its a separate sled.  I think ill combine fishers that attaches to a table saw sled with long sides so I can install some stops on the jig. 

might make a few attachment for the most common angles for segments when making bowls for segment turning. 

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I need to buy some t track and knobs anyone know of the cheapest source of these that I can buy?  hate knowing I found someone that sells it for 1.99 but the shiping ends up being more than the cost of the product. 

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9 hours ago, duckkisser said:

was just trying to find this topic

I like the built in stops but I don't like that fact that its a separate sled.  I think ill combine fishers that attaches to a table saw sled with long sides so I can install some stops on the jig. 

might make a few attachment for the most common angles for segments when making bowls for segment turning. 

Take the parts you want and make it your own, that's cool with me..  For the record, I do have a free set of plans for the sled as well as a build video for it..

55 minutes ago, duckkisser said:

I need to buy some t track and knobs anyone know of the cheapest source of these that I can buy?  hate knowing I found someone that sells it for 1.99 but the shiping ends up being more than the cost of the product. 

The problem with T-Track is that they're not all the same.  Whatever you select for your T-Track, stick with that brand for everything in your shop so that things like stops are interchangeable all over your shop.

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9 hours ago, ..Kev said:

 

The problem with T-Track is that they're not all the same.  Whatever you select for your T-Track, stick with that brand for everything in your shop so that things like stops are interchangeable all over your shop.

only track I have came with my drill press table.  don't have any anywhere else in the shop.  so the track I get will end up being the tracks ill proably use from now on.

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20 hours ago, duckkisser said:

problem is im not a wood worker who makes similar projects.  one week im making a desk and another week im making some bandsaw boxes.

This is true of many of us.  That is why making a bunch of jigs ahead of time is a lot like buying a "set" of router bits.  You will end up with a bunch of items that you never use.  Storing jigs can become its own nightmare in very short order.  When you are planning for a project, if a jig will help you, build it first ;-)

A crosscut sled for the tablesaw is a pretty sure bet.  It is hands down the most used jig in my shop.  It allowed me to recover the massive footprint required by a SCMS or a RAS.  A decent table and fence for your drill press is another winner for most folks. 

I use the heck out of a tenon jig but, other folks could care less.  I do a lot of sliding dovetails and so have a sled for the router table that makes this quick and accurate.  On the other hand I do not do a lot of dovetail panel joints (drawers, carcasses) so I generally just do those by hand.

A mention on t-track.  I fortunately started out using Rockler's Universal track.  I didn't realize I was being smart at the time since that is not my normal behavior ;-)  This track takes 1/4" hex, 1/4" t-bolts/nuts and 5/16" t-bolts and nuts.  This means all my Incra, toilet-bolt, Rockler, Lee Valley, etc. stuff is usable in all the tracks.

I also use the Micro Jig Match-fit clamps.  This is rapidly taking over my use of t-tracks for jigs and fixtures that use holddowns.  T-track is still the way to go for many jig functions though.  As always, YMMV.

 

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50 minutes ago, gee-dub said:

A crosscut sled for the tablesaw is a pretty sure bet.  It is hands down the most used jig in my shop.  It allowed me to recover the massive footprint required by a SCMS or a RAS.  A decent table and fence for your drill press is another winner for most folks. 

x2 on both 

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a cross cut sled is definitely on my list of things to make.  here is the list of jigs that I know I need for sure in the next year or so.....after that they will eventually come in handy. 

I want to make a  miter jig for my cross cut sled  because I want to start making picture frames for my painting that I make.

adjustable spline again for picture frames

sacrificial fence for dado stack 

tennon jig want to use for some benches I want to make

thin ripping making inlay material

box joint want to make a spice rack with box joints. 

dovetail(router) 

panel cutting want to build some cabinets with doors on them for the kitchen

tapering want to make some tapered short legs for said cabinets. 

and I want to get into segmented turning so  I want to build a segment cutting jig. 

so what am I missing that is something that I a must have in the shop. 

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45 minutes ago, duckkisser said:

...thin ripping making inlay material

What jig would you use for this? I do a bit of stringing and banding, and some inlay, and I have a special TS insert as well as a purpose-built push stick but other than that it’s table saw fence and a very thin kerf blade so as not to waste expensive holly etc.

For cutting stringing I have a special fence used with the cutter I built, but there’s no jig per se. So I’m curious what you’ve uncovered. 

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45 minutes ago, duckkisser said:

...thin ripping making inlay material

What jig would you use for this? I do a bit of stringing and banding, and some inlay, and I have a special TS insert as well as a purpose-built push stick but other than that it’s table saw fence and a very thin kerf blade so as not to waste expensive holly etc.

For cutting stringing I have a special fence used with the cutter I built, but there’s no jig per se. So I’m curious what you’ve uncovered. 

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10 minutes ago, Chip Sawdust said:

What jig would you use for this? I do a bit of stringing and banding, and some inlay, and I have a special TS insert as well as a purpose-built push stick but other than that it’s table saw fence and a very thin kerf blade so as not to waste expensive holly etc.

For cutting stringing I have a special fence used with the cutter I built, but there’s no jig per se. So I’m curious what you’ve uncovered. 

I was going to make the thin riping push stick that fisher made in his video seems like it would be perfects to cut super thin pieces.  I have more than a few moments where I thought a thin light piece would end up geting kicked up and hit me in the face.  I would very much like to see your set up for cutting thin stock with your ts insert

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I want to make the wedgie sled but the templates for the middle seem like they will be a pain to cut for the sled....also don't want to buy from the website (too cheap :)) wish I had a cnc and knew how to use it then I could just batch out a set for myself.  oh well ill just have to get by.  

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Duck, I just today got a catalog from MLCS and they have on page two, a Multiform crosscut sled, for $189.95.  It might be worth looking into.

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I use a circular saw ripping blade since they’re thinner, and made an insert for that. For a push stick I just used MDF and it works great. Nothing special about it except if the part that pushes the strip gets broken you need to re-cut it. That part has to be fresh. It’s lasted a long time. 
I wouldn’t call it a jig, but I did build a small bench that goes on top of my bench for working on close-up stuff like legs and other stringing/banding projects. It works great. I made an angle block in the vice that holds tapered legs really well. I got that whole idea from Steve Latta but I wish I had thought of it :) It’s indispensable to me now. 

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oh god chip you put the thin stick that close to fence that always make me super nervous.  I also have a zero clearance insert for table saw don't use it much if you make a push stick you don't move fence and you end up having like a 3 inch space between fence and moving blade but it still cuts strips of wood that are like 1/8 thick.  

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Duck, I cut thin strips the same as Chip. Always using a push device with a 'heel' to support the strip as it passes the blade, there has never been any hint of kick-back. If I wanted to cut paper-thin strips, I would clamp a sacrificial piece of MDF to the fence to avoid any chance of flexing the blade into the fence itself.

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I would have thought the way to do it would be to place the fence on the cut off side with a short accessory fence attached.  The accessory fence would extend up to, but not along side the blade.  The work would then be advanced into the blade and the thin cut off would fall away.  I know I've seen something like this done somewhere.

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i would do a jig like this but without the stops in the back don't see why you need those oh and I would do a zero clearance insert. if you set up a measuring guide like this you don't have to worry about the thin pieces getting trapped between the blade and the fence.

I know Rockler has a guide for this and I could do the same thing with a Magwitch but those cost money I think that I have a bolt and a wingnut in my cup holder in my car.....all the hardware you really need.

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